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Posts Tagged ‘Young Adult Cross-Over’

This is the ninth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

12 Bells large Owl art: One of my owl pen and ink sketches from Owl Light.

Owl fact: A barn owl can eat up to 1,000 mice per year. No wonder farmers try to attract barn owls to help control rodents!

Owl folklore: Because of their association with the goddess Athena, owls are sometimes viewed as guardians with a magical inner light that enabled them to see at night.

Owl link: The Barn Owl Conservatory Network focuses on British Barn Owls. Still, there is a lot of information here that owl fans will find interesting  and a video with lots of Barn Owl Facts.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

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This is the eighth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

Rush of Wings right side Owl art: Part of one of my acrylic paintings. The painting has been sold, but I’d still like to see the image used for a magazine or book cover. Alas, this steampunk girl and her owls wasn’t quite right for the cover of Owl Light.

Owl fact: A group of owls is called a parliament, wisdom, or study.

Owl folklore: In Ancient Greece, owls were thought to accompany Greek soldiers to war, and to see one soaring over the army prior to battle was a sign of victory.

Owl link: Check out xeno-canto.org. Fun website devoted to sharing bird sounds from around the world. There are lots of owl calls for your listening pleasure and here’s a video of a Tawny Owl hooting.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

Read Full Post »

This is the seventh blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

Owl Light back cover Owl art: The painting used for the back cover of Owl Light.

Owl fact: The biggest threat nowadays to owls are pesticides that poison both owls & their food sources, habitat loss, and persecution from humans because of superstitions and folklore. If you spot an owl – enjoy the view, but let it be. If you want to help owls: 1) Try not to use pesticides. 2) Put up an owl box for a little man-made housing to replace a bit of habitat that we’re destroying. 3) Educate yourself, your family & friends about owls. And don’t believe all the negative folklore.

Owl folklore: Athena, the ancient Greek Goddess of Wisdom, chose a Little Owl (Athene noctua) as her favorite bird.

Owl link: The Powerful Owl Project in Australia is an example of owl conservation. Read more about it here  and watch a video about Powerful Owls.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

Read Full Post »

This is the sixth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

0 Owl & Moon cover page Owl art: One of my owl scratchboard drawings from Owl Light.

Owl fact: While most owls are nocturnal, a few species feed during the day or at dusk.

Owl folklore: Sir Walter Scott must have believed, like many people of his time, owls were harbingers of doom, death, and bad news when he wrote: “Birds of omen dark and foul,/ Night-crow, raven, bat, and owl,/ Leave the sick man to his dream –/ All night long he heard your scream.”

Owl link: Want to know more about Northern Owls? Check out Owlman’s Owl in a Night’s Work page.  and a video of a Boreal Owl.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

Read Full Post »

This is the fifth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

2 Pawprints large art Owl art: One of my owl pen and ink sketches from Owl Light.

Owl fact: There are over 150 species of owls (and some folks think that number to be over 200 species).

Owl folklore: In some cultures, an owl hanging around a home is a sign that a powerful shaman lives in the house and is using the bird as a messenger.

Owl link: If you’re looking for fabulous owl pictures and lots of owl info, you might want to check out The Owls Plexus  and an audio and video of a Barred Owl.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

Read Full Post »

This is the fourth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

13 Three Owls extra Owl art: One of my owl pen and ink sketches from Owl Light.

Owl fact: Mice, voles, rabbits, insects, birds, and even fish are on the menu of owls. Since owls cannot chew their food, they swallow chunks of their prey. Later, owls regurgitate pellets of bone, fur, teeth, feathers, and other indigestible material.

Owl folklore: According to folklore, if you hear an owl hooting, count the hoots for a peek into the future:
1 hoot for impending death
2 hoots for success in a venture
3 hoots a woman will marry into the family
4 hoots for a disturbance
5 hoots for travel
6 hoots for guests arriving
7 hoots for mental distress
8 hoots for sudden death
and 9 hoots for good fortune

Owl link: Here’s an interesting article, How to Attract Owls (And Why You Want To)  and a video of four species of owls hooting.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

Read Full Post »

This is the third blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

4 Gabeta small Owl art: One of my owl pen and ink sketches from Owl Light.

Owl fact: The tufts of feathers that look like ears atop an owl’s head are nothing but feathers!

Owl folklore: William Shakespeare wrote of the owl as a premonition of death in Julius Caesar: “…yesterday, the bird of night did sit Even at noonday, upon the market place, Hooting and shrieking…”

Owl link: Love Snowy Owls as much as I do? Here’s a National Geographic article about Snowy Owls.  and a video of a hooting Snowy Owl.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

Read Full Post »

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