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Posts Tagged ‘Young Adult Cross-Over’

cinder I’ve never tried to write a novel in November (National Novel Writing Month), but I cheer on my writer friends who make the attempt. And I salute those persistent friends who manage to complete a novel in a month’s time.

I’ve heard all the doubting Thomases and Thomasinas who say, “Why bother? Nothing good comes of writing a novel in thirty days.”

Actually, they’re wrong! Many NaNoWriMo novels prove quite successful, including one of my favorites, Cinder, by Marissa Meyer. Here’s the link to: Seven YA Must Reads That Started As NaNoWriMo Projects from the Barnes & Noble Teen Blog if you want to read more.

So keep on writing NaNoWriMo challenge-takers. I wish you success, and admire your dedication.

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Skean copy As I’ve written before, every time I discover a new review of my books, my hands sweat and my heart thumps quickly. It’s always a little scary to see what a reader thinks of the worlds I’ve created. Perhaps they won’t like my story or fantastical world or language or characters or…

Thanks to those people who part with a few dollars and open the (real or virtual) pages of my books. I’m grateful for readers and for their support, both when they purchase my books and when they take the time to review them.

From Amazon, here are a few reviews of The Enchanted Skean:

“Vonnie Winslow Crist has written a fantastical story that brings the reader along for the journey. Young Beck is sent on a mission by his grandmother to bring his father’s bones back home. In the process he discovers the skean and finds out that it is enchanted. I loved this story. I found that the characters were very interesting and I wanted to know more about them. This book is a fun read for young adults and older.” – April Sue Billings

“Originally, I purchased this book for my nephew but was drawn in by the beautiful cover. It’s a wonderful read and I enjoyed the way the fantasy was presented…the protagonist was believable, and without being preachy, the book sends a good message. BTW, my nephew loved it also, and wants to know when the next one is coming out!”  – Haley’s Comments

“Loved this! Highly recommend for both middle readers and adult alike. I’ve read several of this author’s books, and she’s definitely an up-and-coming talent to watch.” – Katie (Hagerstown, MD)

You can find other reviews of The Enchanted Skean on this blog at Looking for Stars, Lucky Thirteen, and First Reviews of The Enchanted Skean.

Thanks again to my readers. Interested in checking out a copy? Here’s the Amazon link for The Enchanted Skean.

(BTW, if you write a review on Amazon or Amazon UK of one of my books, I might reprint it on Whimsical Words).

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Owl and Pussycat

Rush of Wings owl close up This is the seventeenth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

Owl art: One of my owl images.

Owl fact: “Scientists believe that domestic cats’ night vision is as good as owls’. Also like owls, cats see only in black and white and shades of gray.” – Raptor!, Laubach, Laubach & Smith, p5.

Owl children’s poem: The Owl and the Pussycat was written by Edward Lear (1812-1888). Here are the first 3 stanzas: “The owl and the pussycat went to sea/ In a beautiful peagreen boat/ They took some honey and plenty of money/ Wrapped up in a five-pound note./ The owl looked up to the stars above/ And sang to a small guitar,/ ‘O, lovely pussy, o pussy my love,/ What a beautiful pussy you are!’/ Pussy said to the owl, ‘You elegant fowl,/ How charmingly sweet you sing./ O, let us be married, too long we have tarried,/ But what shall we do for a ring?’”

Owl link: Well, there’s no peagreen boat involved, but here’s an interesting video featuring an owl and pussycat.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.  Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

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Owl Light back cover This is the sixteenth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

Owl art: One of my owls from Owl Light.

Owl fact: Burrowing owls can imitate the rattling sound of an angry rattlesnake. This is a good defense when predators are around.

Owl saying: “The owl thinks her children the fairest” (Danish)

Owl quote: “Moon light and star light, owl and moth light,/ Glow-worm glowlight on a grassblade./ O Light Invisible, we worship Thee!” – TS Elliot

Owl link: Cape Coral Friends of Wildlife sponsor an annual Burrowing Owl Festival (next one in February 2015) and also provide information on their website including a chance to sponsor a Burrowing Owl. In addition, not to be missed is a video of Burrowing Owls.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.  Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

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This is the twelfth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

12 Bells small Owl art: One of my owl pen and ink sketches from Owl Light.

Owl fact: Owls are found on all continents except Antarctica. But, alas, only 19 species of owls are found in North America.

Owl folklore: Artemidorus of Daldis, a 2nd century Greek diviner and dream interpreter (and author of Oneirocritica or in English: The Interpretation of Dreams), believed to dream of an owl meant a traveler would be robbed, shipwrecked, or meet with some other disaster on his journey.

Owl link: Share the adventures of a pair of Northern Barred Owls on Owl Cam – a fun to watch site.  And a video of Barred Owls which includes their rather haunting call.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

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Get ready to celebrate! August 4th – International Owl Awareness Day is upon us.

This is the eleventh blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

Barn Owl sketch for cover Owl art: The original owl pencil sketch, which became a pen and ink drawing, which was the basis for part of a painting, which eventually became the front cover of Owl Light.

Owl folklore: A Gloucestershire legend says that Jesus visited a baker looking for something to eat. The baker put a loaf into the oven for Him, but the baker’s daughter decided it was too large, and divided it in half. Nevertheless, the dough rose to a huge size. Upon seeing this, the daughter cried, “Heugh! Heugh! Heugh!” and was transformed into an owl.

Owl quote: William Shakespeare refers to this folklore in his play, Hamlet, when he has Ophelia comment: “Well, God ‘ield you! They say the owl was a baker’s daughter.”

Owl link: Here’s the link to the Facebook Page for International Owl Awareness Day, (lots of fun owl photos here), and a video of an Eurasian Eagle Owl hooting.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

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This is the tenth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

Rush of Wings owl close up Owl art: A small rectangle of a larger painting called “Rush of Wings,” rather than a drawing from Owl Light. “Rush of Wings” was used as a page in a 2014 calendar of my speculative art published by Alban Lake Publishing.

Owl fact: An owl has 3 sets of eyelids: 1 for sleeping, 1 for blinking, and 1 to clean the eyeball and keep it healthy.

Owl saying: Even an owlet is beautiful in the eyes of its mother.

Owl folklore: People of the Lenape Native American tribe (named by Europeans: “Delaware Indians”), believed that if you dreamt of an Owl, it would become your guardian.

Owl link: If you want to know about North and Central American owls, Owling is the site for you,  and a video of a very vocal owl.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

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This is the ninth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

12 Bells large Owl art: One of my owl pen and ink sketches from Owl Light.

Owl fact: A barn owl can eat up to 1,000 mice per year. No wonder farmers try to attract barn owls to help control rodents!

Owl folklore: Because of their association with the goddess Athena, owls are sometimes viewed as guardians with a magical inner light that enabled them to see at night.

Owl link: The Barn Owl Conservatory Network focuses on British Barn Owls. Still, there is a lot of information here that owl fans will find interesting  and a video with lots of Barn Owl Facts.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

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This is the eighth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

Rush of Wings right side Owl art: Part of one of my acrylic paintings. The painting has been sold, but I’d still like to see the image used for a magazine or book cover. Alas, this steampunk girl and her owls wasn’t quite right for the cover of Owl Light.

Owl fact: A group of owls is called a parliament, wisdom, or study.

Owl folklore: In Ancient Greece, owls were thought to accompany Greek soldiers to war, and to see one soaring over the army prior to battle was a sign of victory.

Owl link: Check out xeno-canto.org. Fun website devoted to sharing bird sounds from around the world. There are lots of owl calls for your listening pleasure and here’s a video of a Tawny Owl hooting.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

Read Full Post »

This is the seventh blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

Owl Light back cover Owl art: The painting used for the back cover of Owl Light.

Owl fact: The biggest threat nowadays to owls are pesticides that poison both owls & their food sources, habitat loss, and persecution from humans because of superstitions and folklore. If you spot an owl – enjoy the view, but let it be. If you want to help owls: 1) Try not to use pesticides. 2) Put up an owl box for a little man-made housing to replace a bit of habitat that we’re destroying. 3) Educate yourself, your family & friends about owls. And don’t believe all the negative folklore.

Owl folklore: Athena, the ancient Greek Goddess of Wisdom, chose a Little Owl (Athene noctua) as her favorite bird.

Owl link: The Powerful Owl Project in Australia is an example of owl conservation. Read more about it here  and watch a video about Powerful Owls.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

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