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Posts Tagged ‘words’

Anyone who knows me, knows I love words. Not just the everyday, run of the mill, nothing special sort of words, but the wonderfully weird words.

Some fabulous words are archaic. Used generations ago, they’ve fallen our of favor for one reason or another.

Some words sound lovely when falling off the tongue. But those who value ease of speech more than the lyrical sound of a word, have shunted these ear-ticklers to the never-used corner of the dictionary.

Some words are so specific, the need for their usage is limited—unless you write speculative fiction, in which case they can be the inspiration for a story (or at least a sentence or two).

Other words just never caught on, never made it into our day-to-day language.

One of the sites that celebrate these word addities is Grandiloquent Words on Facebook. For those who love language and words as much as I do, I recommend taking a look.

And don’t be stampointed by the quirky list of words on the site.

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I try not to be guilty of any of the 30 problem words and phrases listed in this blog post. Alas, there are times when I fall into the pit of bad grammar and cliches.

Some writers say readers don’t notice or care if they make “small” mistakes. I say, readers do notice and do care. Writers who respect their readers should work hard to avoid sloppy writing.

I hope you’re enjoying my blog posts and links. Want to show some love? Visit my Amazon page and consider buying a book. 🙂

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I went through these 50 often mispronounced words, and found that I was guilty of a couple of them. (But I will not confess to which ones!) Who cares? – you might ask.

I suspect quite a few people will notice if you don’t pronounce a word correctly. People like a job interviewer, a reviewer, a potential client, an agent, a librarian at a library branch where you’d like to speak, an audience, a classroom full of kids, or a radio, television, or Skype interviewer.

How many of the 50 do you mispronounce?

I hope you’re enjoying my blog posts and links. Want to show some love? Visit my Amazon page and consider buying a book. 🙂

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For word-geeks like me, words have a personality defined by in the way they fall off the tongue, enter the ear, and look on the page. There are words that seem beautiful even if you don’t know their meaning. Likewise, there are words which strike a sour note long before you look them up in a dictionary. Here’s a link to a fun list of beautiful and ugly words. Can you think of any that should have been included on this list and weren’t?

I hope you’re enjoying my blog posts and links. Want to show some love? Visit my Amazon page and consider buying a book. 🙂

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I love to add interjections to my dialogue, blog posts, emails, letters, and conversations. I’m not sure why – perhaps it’s just the fun of saying them. Or perhaps it’s imagining the person on the other end of the story, book, letter, or blog saying them outloud when they see them.

I think reading the comics when I was young (and I still read a few) introduced me to: Argh, Bwah-hah-hah, Gak, Pshaw, Uh-oh, and Zowie. Here’s a list of the top 100 interjections, can you think of others?

I hope you’re enjoying my blog posts and links. Want to show some love? Visit my Amazon page and consider buying a book. 🙂

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Life, per usual, is too busy. Therefore, I’m a day late wishing everyone a Happy Dictionary Day!

As a lover of words, this is a day to celebrate the marvelous words, both cutting-edge and archaic, that fill our dictionaries. A couple of years ago, I stumbled across a particularly fascinating word, and wrote an entire story just so I could use it. Bloodguiltless was the beginning place for that short story titled, The Nestgatherers of Gad. It’s unpublished – but since writing the initial draft, I’ve decided to work the story into a novel length piece of fiction. A book from one word? It’s possible.

Another fabulous word is mumbletypeg. Which is even fun to say out loud! It’s used in the very first paragraph of one of my newer stories. And how much more delightful is kerfuffle to mutter than disturbance? How much more interesting is it to open a bumbershoot rather than umbrella? How much more of a clunker does a car seem when I call it a flivver?

Why was October 16th chosen for this celebration? It seems Daniel Webster, who compiled the first American English Dictionary, was born on that date in 1758. So Happy Belated Birthday to Daniel Webster, too.

So grab a dictionary, and find a new word to add to your vocabulary. As for me, I’m geeky enough to not only enjoy perusing a dictionary and thesaurus every now-and-again, but to subscribe to “Word of the Day.” Everyday, a new word is delivered to my email in-box. Often, I recognize the word; but sometimes, the word is so strange and irresistible that I must immediately include it in my writing.

And speaking of my writing, I have a new interview up on author KS Brooks’ blog, “Write Write Write.” Please take a look at the interview & comment: http://tinyurl.com/on-writing-VWC-interview

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