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Posts Tagged ‘Wolfsinger Publications’

Every now and again, I let my readers know where they can find some of my stories. I’m always grateful to the editors who’ve selected my tales, and to the readers who keep coming back for more of the stories my somewhat skewed brain dishes out.

So for those looking for good reads (not just of my stories, but of the  many other wonderful tales included in these publications), here’s the list with links:

“Snowbroth,” a zombie/ghostly tale, Potter’s Field 5, edited by Robert Krog, from Alban Lake Publishing. (available)

“The Return of Gunnar Kettilson,” a zombie love story with a Norse vibe, Chilling Ghost Short Stories, from Flame Tree Publishing (UK). Flame Tree Publishing has even included a nice blog post with some of the included authors’ bios. (available for preorder)

“Scarecrow,” a dark science fiction love story, Trysts of Fate #4 – Aug. 2015, edited by lee Ann Story Sikora, from Alban Lake Publishing. (available)

“Beneath the Summer Moon,” a fantasy tale of transformation, Epona’s Children, edited by Carol Hightshoe, available soon from Wolfsinger Publications. (I’ll post link when available).

“Smoke and Sprites,” a science fiction tale set on Mars, Hides the Dark Tower, available soon from Pole to Pole Publishing. (I’ll post link when available).

I’ll add a bit of writer’s advice to the bottom of this post: Keep submitting!

I know this seems like a no-brainer, but it’s important to focus on reaching your readers. When (notice I don’t say, “If”) a story is rejected, find another market and send it out again. Keep sending your story out until you find a market, or until you’re ready to revise the story, and then, start submitting again. Persistence is the key to being published.

As I’ve told writers’ groups in many a presentation, “Sometimes, I think an editor is just tired of seeing submissions from me. They finally give up and say, ‘Let’s just take a story, so she’ll leave us alone!'” All kidding aside, a writer is never published unless they submit their stories to publications. Which means, a writer never finds their readers unless they submit their work to magazines, anthologies, etc. Best of luck to all of you writers out there as you look for publishers.

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Thanks to speculative author Phoebe Wray for stopping by and sharing her journey as she steps into the unfamiliar shoes of a mystery writer.

Writing My First Mystery-Thriller by Phoebe Wray

WRAY INFORMAL HEADSHOT “In Adam’s Fall, a mystery-thriller just released from Wolfsinger Publishing, is my first attempt at this genre. I’ve been writing futurist-dystopian action-adventure novels and stories for the last six years (pardon the plethora of hyphens) usually classed as science fiction. I had this itch of a story that kept interrupting my thoughts. I wanted to explore what happens in an ordinary, pleasant, small town when the curse of our times – bigotry, racial profiling, and senseless violence — interrupts the birdsong.

I wasn’t sure I could write a mystery. Didn’t it have to have red herrings, complicated villains, and a plot full of twists and turns? Well, yes, but so does science fiction. Police procedure? Again yes, at least some. I had taken an online course on that years ago, and dug out my notes. They weren’t very helpful. I decided to just write the story and then figure out what it was.

Someone murders a beautiful young Muslim woman and leaves the body next to the dumpster in Nikki, my heroine’s, back yard. She stumbles over it early in the morning on a beautiful April day. That’s the start of the sled-ride it becomes.

I worked for many years as a journalist and reporter and the old newspaper mantra is drummed into my brain: Who? What? When? Where? Why? And sometimes, “How?” In this case, mostly “why?” That litany was useful for a mystery. Above all, I believe a mystery-thriller has to make sense, the pieces must finally come together with some logic, even if that logic is hateful.

IAFCover In this novel, the anger, the madness, in the killer escalates, not just with gun violence, but with his hateful racist messages. The bad guy has the severe case of tunnel vision that racists possess and because Nikki is a history teacher with old New England roots, he believes she will agree with his anti-Arab, “take back America” rhetoric. When she doesn’t, he focuses on her, stalking her and attacking the town itself. He sets fire to the local church, sprays racist graffiti on the school, takes pot-shots at the FBI, his acts more random and finally deadly.

In a sense, In Adam’s Fall is a stalking novel but its themes and ideas reflect what we hear on every o’clock news. How do we understand those? How do we confront them? Do we forgive them? The novel was written before the horror of New Town and Colorado. Nikki struggles to understand and to cope with the terror and with the sudden unwelcome celebrity that such incidents bring in their wake.

IAFBackCover(1) I made up the little town where Nikki lives, but it looks suspiciously like the one I live in, as it was when I moved here in 1976. We’ve spiffed up since then, with a new firehouse and police station, but I used the old ones. I manipulated the geography a little, too, but used our street names. Who could resist a heroine who lives on Snake Hill Road?”

For more information on Phoebe Wray, visit her at: http://jemma7729.blogspot.com Her books can be purchase through her publishers: Wolfsinger Publications: http://wolfsingerpubs.com/Intro.html and Dark Quest, LLC: http://darkquestbooks.com and at Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/Phoebe-Wray-Amazon

Thanks again to Phoebe Wray for her guest post. Watch Whimsical Words for more guests, blogs from me, and my new feature, Readers & Writers Recipes. Have a try-something-new day!– Vonnie

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