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tanya lisle Whimsical Words welcomes guest author, Tanya Lisle. Tanya Lisle is a novelist from Metro Vancouver, British Columbia who has series littered across genres from supernatural horror to young adult fantasy. She began writing in elementary school, when she started turning homework assignments into short stories and continued this trend well into university. While attending Simon Fraser University, she developed an appreciation for public domain crossovers and cross-platform narratives. She has a shelf full of notebooks with more story ideas than pens lost to the depths of her bag. Now, she writes incessantly in hopes of finishing all of them.

Thankfully, her cat, Remy, has figured out how to shut off Tanya’s computer when she needs to take a break.

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000040_00002] Tanya’s latest book, Static, is a fun read for those who enjoy mysteries. A quick summary for my readers: Harrison’s boyfriend, Max, is missing. Again. Or, well, his ex-boyfriend, he thinks. His memory of the last week is fuzzy. It’s while his roommate, Ally, is trying to help him that they get the phone call; Max has gone missing, and Willow—who’s supposed to be catatonic and locked away—abducted him.

Harrison sets out on a mission to find him, but he and his friends are placed under house arrest. Is it to keep them safe from Willow, or is Harrison being used for live bait? Trapped with the mysterious new Doctor Gethen who’s taken a keen interest in them, Harrison needs to make things right, find Willow, and get Max back.

Where did the idea come from for your latest book, Static?

This idea actually spun off of a scene that I originally came up with to torment a friend of mine that liked the first book, White Noise. Once I had it written down, I couldn’t get it out of my head and it just spiraled into a sequel from there. The scene where Max gets kidnapped again has been mostly removed from the book, but it’s still the inciting incident of the whole book.

Who is your favorite character in the book—and why?

That would have to be Mary. She made only a cameo in the first book and getting a chance to write her was everything that I could have hoped for. She’s been dragged along for this ride against her will and watching her deal with the bad situation, as well as her relationships with the other characters, has been fantastic and a lot of fun.

Is your book traditionally published, indie published, or self published?

Like the rest of my books, it’s indie published. It’s given me the freedom to switch between genres, put out books on my own schedule, and find my own people to work with.

On the down side, it’s a more expensive option and I have to do all the marketing and promotion on my own. Which is a lot more difficult when it’s a sequel to a book that originally came out a few years ago, so trying to rekindle the excitement in an audience that’s since found other books is a little tricky. Hopefully, they remember and will bring more people along for the ride!

What is your writing process like—are you an architect (planner) or gardener (pantser)?

For my first drafts, I usually go in with a plan. I know who my main cast is, how I want them to move through the story, and where they eventually end up. By about the third chapter, I will have thrown half of that away and create a whole new road map based on how the narrative is going and new ideas. A few chapters later, I’ll do it again. And again. And again.

The story doesn’t end up being fully formed until I sit down to rewrite it. After a few months, I go back to the story, figure out what ideas really worked and which ones didn’t and then rewrite the whole thing again until it’s put back together into something fantastic.

What was your favorite book as a child?

I read this collection of Alfred Hitchcock short stories that was in the library which probably explains a few things about my stories. As a kid I read the stories and I was fascinated by the ideas and not at all impacted by the horror elements. I thought it was much more interesting than it was scary. I found I really liked the feeling of suspense and I spent a few years trying to emulate it as a teen. Even now, I think there’s still some of that influence in a lot of my narratives.

What writing project are you currently working on?

I am currently working on the last few things for Dead Air, which is Book Three, and the final book in this series so that it can come out in January. There’s just a couple small tweaks left for the paperback— and it will be ready to go!

I’ve also just finished a few drafts for another series, The Looking Glass Saga, and gotten another draft back from my editor to start working through, so I’m also working through that one when I have a bit of time between other projects.

What’s the best writing advice anyone ever gave you?

It’s been said many times by many different people in many different ways, so I don’t have a direct quote, but it’s this: A bad draft is better than no draft. If you want to make something good, you’re probably going to make something not so good to start with, but it’s easier to edit something into perfection than it is to bring it forth fully formed as perfect. And really, it’s more fun making something terrible and finding those golden moments in it than it is to start with something amazing anyway.

Want to learn more about Tanya Lisle and Static? Check out her :
Website & Blog, Facebook, Twitter, Amazon page, and Instagram.
Or better yet, purchase a copy of Static.

Thanks to author Tanya Lisle for stopping by. Watch for an interview with author L.J. Cohen on December 18. Happy reading! – Vonnie

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