Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Steven Southard’

Just last week, I had to write another author bio. Though I reluctantly did so, I hate writing an author biography for a publication, website, con booklet, etc. Either I feel like I’m “bragging,” under-selling myself, or selecting the wrong things to include.

The simpler is better wisdom doesn’t always apply. Sometimes, if your bio is too simple, you appear unprofessional or inexperienced when compared to other writers included in an anthology, magazine, con directory of panel participants, or writers’ conference.

Then again, you don’t want to include every place you’ve been published, every award you’ve ever won, and every education tidbit. Judicious selection is best–so what’s that?

Depending on the location where your bio is to appear, you select those professional achievements which most closely align with the interests of the readers or attendees. What do I mean?

When I have a story appearing in a science fiction anthology, I don’t typically mention I’ve been published in “Faerie Magazine” and other fantasy publications or Killing It Softly 2 or other horror publications. Instead, I focus on writing which is science fiction in nature, listing Lost Signals of the Terran Republic, Outposts of Beyond,  Defending the Future: Dogs of War, or other places which have published my science fiction stories.

This means, I have a science fiction bio, a fantasy bio, and a horror bio–but wait, there’s more! A writing conference bio needs to reflect your experience and expertise in the subjects of the panels or workshops you’re presenting. Plus, it needs to lure an audience into attending.

For more on writing multiple bios, here’s the link to an informative post from author friend, Steven Southard: Tailoring Your Author Bio.

Thanks for reading, and keep on writing! – Vonnie

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

catseye_final-72dpiI had the privilege to edit a wonderful new anthology from Pole to Pole Publishing, In a Cat’s Eye, with writing friend, Kelly A. Harmon. By the way, the title comes from an English proverb: “In a cat’s eye, all things belong to cats.”

We received hundreds of stories, and had to turn down some good cat tales. But the 16 stories which share the final table of contents provide a fun and satisfying read for cat lovers and fans of speculative fiction. And I can honestly say, there are a couple of stories in In a Cat’s Eye, I wish I’d written! (Which is the highest compliment I can offer).

To read a bit more about some of the stories and their authors, here’s a link to a fascinating post on the blog of one of the contributors, Gregory L. Norris. You can find out more about the thoughts behind the cat stories of Gail Z. Martin, Oliver Smith, Steven R. Southard, KI Borrowman, Christine Lucas, Doug C. Souza, AL Sirois, AL Kaplan, and, of course, Gregory L. Norris.

If you, a friend, or family member loves cat stories or science fiction and fantasy, In a Cat’s Eye just might be the book for you. Here’s a buy link, just in case.

 

Read Full Post »

I taught poetry residencies for the Maryland State Arts Council’s Artists-in-Education Program for over ten years to students from kindergarten through grade twelve. It was a wonderful, but exhausting, experience. The first thing I wrote on the board when I walked into the classroom was: “”Poetry excites the senses!” And then, I’d write my name.

Because of the limited number of words a poet has to express their ideas, they must choose wisely. In my opinion, the wisest way to express yourself and grab a reader is to use sensory language. I used to had out a list of sensory words for all five senses, then I’d have the students read aloud the smell and/or taste words. I still hand out that list to prose and poetry writing workshops I teach – whether young writers, college level courses, or adults.

Why? Because a writer needs to be observant. He or she needs to see, hear, smell, taste, and touch the world around them, and use that information to enrich their writing. Readers can more easily become immersed in your world when they can identify with the sensory experiences your characters are having.

Again, I’m going to link to writing friend Steven R. Southard’s blog, Poseidon’s Scribe where he discusses another way for writers to think like Leonardo da Vinci: Sensazione.

Read Full Post »

Thanks to author Steven Southard for stopping by and sharing the Biblical background for his story, “Ancient Spin.” Enjoy!

Alas, Babel by Steven Southard

Steve Southard photo ‘First of all, I’d like to thank Vonnie Winslow Crist for allowing me to post as a guest on her blog, and also for including my story, “Ancient Spin,” in Pole to Pole Publishing’s anthology Hides the Dark Tower which she co-edited with Kelly A. Harmon.

“Ancient Spin” takes place in the land of Shinar near the site of the Tower of Babel, that lofty and legendary edifice whose story comes to us from Genesis. In the Biblical version, God sees the tower and disapproves of mankind speaking a single tongue. God scatters people across the Earth and confuses human languages. In some accounts, God also destroys “‘the tower.

Perhaps it’s all true, perhaps not. But if the Babel story is just a tale, then what is the truth? Was there an actual tower? What was it like and what happened to it? The people of Mesopotamia certainly constructed tall structures, many taking the tiered form of ziggurats. (Ziggurat—what a fun word!)

Some accounts state that Babel was built of fired brick, cemented with clay. At some point the people of the region shifted from sunbaked bricks to the sturdier fired brick. Even so, such buildings had to be built with much shallower angles (sloped like a pyramid) than our modern, vertical skyscrapers constructed of steel I-beams.

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000039_00001] Living in a flat plain, the people of the time must have considered these towers truly imposing. But even buildings constructed from fired brick would not have endured forever, and might have collapsed suddenly. In “Ancient Spin,” that’s the backstory. The Tower of Babel has just fallen and my main character is dealing with the disaster’s aftermath.

The story is very short, and if I’m not careful, this blog post could surpass the length of the tale I’m describing. You’ll meet only two characters—Eullil, and his brother, Ludarat. The name Eullil is my own corruption of the Sumerian words for “may the temple last into distant days.” Likewise, Ludarat is my twisting of “eternal man.”

I’m looking forward to reading the rest of the stories in Pole to Pole Publishing’s new anthology, Hides the Dark Tower. It’s my hope you’ll buy it and enjoy “Ancient Spin.” If you do, and you end up craving more of my stories like:

“Ripper’s Ring,” http://www.gypsyshadow.com/StevenSouthard.html#Ripper

“Time’s Deformèd Hand,” http://www.gypsyshadow.com/StevenSouthard.html#TimesHand

or “The Cometeers,” http://www.gypsyshadow.com/StevenSouthard.html#Cometeers

Visit me on Twitter, on Facebook, and my website where I sign each entry as— Poseidon’s Scribe’

About the suthor: Steven R. Southard’s short stories stack up in ten different anthologies including Dead Bait, Quest for Atlantis, and Avast, Ye Airships! He’s the tall and looming author of the What Man Hath Wrought series, with thirteen stories at last count. An engineer and former submariner, Steve takes readers to new heights with engaging characters in distant places and varied historical periods. He builds stories in the genres of steampunk, clockpunk, science fiction, fantasy, and horror.

Thanks again to Stephen Southard for his guest post. Watch Whimsical Words for more guests, Quotable Wednesdays, blogs from me, and more. Have a well-constructed day! – Vonnie

 

Read Full Post »

Hands-on learning is far more important than hearing someone else’s experiences.

Just like it’s easier to learn to knit with yarn and knitting needles in-hand than reading about the process or even watching a video; it’s easier to find your most productive writing process through trial and error.

Steven R. Southard has the second in his How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci series up on his blog, Poseidon’s Scribe. It’s an interesting take on da Vinci’s thinking and how to apply it to writing.

I recommend taking a look at this post which encourages writers to not trust Wikipedia and other peoples’ experiences, but to try things out for themselves. Or as Southard puts it: “test knowledge through experience, persistence, and a willingness to learn from mistakes.” Here’s the link to the article for your reading pleasure.

Read Full Post »

I find myself reading with interest a blog post by Steven Southard. Steven has a story in the Hides the Dark Tower anthology due out from Pole to Pole Publishing this fall. (An anthology I highly recommend. It contains some thought-provoking and fabulously-written stories).

Of course, the minute you include Da Vinci, I’m already interested. An artist, inventor, and scientist, Da Vinci is one of my favorite creators from the past. I had the good fortune to see some of his art, up close and personal, this August in the Queen’s Gallery in London. Smaller in scale than you might imagine, nevertheless his black and white sketches were intricate and accurate.

So what in the world does this have to do with writing? The first (of seven) Da Vinci principles Southard examines is curiosity. I’m an advocate of curiosity – in fact, I think it’s one of the most important things a person can possess. We sometimes forget the wonder and curiosity of childhood, when we should be holding on to them for dear life.

For your reading pleasure, here’s a link to Curiosita.

 

Read Full Post »

The Story Arc, or as it’s formally known, the Narrative Arc is something we learned in school. It was simplified and taught in a watered-down way in elementary school, re-taught to us in middle school, and finally, some time in high school we really got what our English teacher was talking about: it’s the path of the story or narrative.

In the old days (yes, I’m older than many of my readers), the Narrative Arc taught was always the Gustav Freytag version: Esposition, Inciting Incident (Complication), Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution, and Denouement. (I’ve always liked the word “Denoument,” it sounds quite lovely, almost like the name of an exotic character in a mystery novel).

Nowadays, there are many versions of the Narrative or Story Arc. It is useful for writers (and readers) to be aware of the various structures. When I write a story, it doesn’t always fit into the Gustav Frytag mold. But it is important for me to keep some format in mind when writing. Readers need to feel the story has a structure and the author has a plan.

I found a great post on Story or Narrative Arcs on speculative writer, Steven Southard’s blog: Shifting the Narrative Arc.

Enoy the post!

Read Full Post »