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Posts Tagged ‘Spock’

News today of Leonard Nimoy’s death brings sadness to many fans of Star Trek. As a kid, I watched the original show on television. Later, I enjoyed the re-runs and Star Trek movies featuring Spock, Kirk, Scotty, Bones, and the rest of the crew of the Starship Enterprise. And it was a delight to see an older Leonard Nimoy reprising his role in the new Star Trek movies.

Saturday is not my usual day for quotes, but an exception will be made. The man who played the ever logical Vulcan, Spock, Leonard Nimoy said: “Logic is the beginning of wisdom, not the end.” Which, if one thinks about it, is quite true.

On the subject of exploration, one would assume Nimoy would promote space exploration, instead he said: “That is the exploration that awaits you! Not mapping stars and studying nebula, but charting the unknown possibilities of existence.”

And lastly, I’ll quote a tweet from Leonard Nimoy sent on February 23, 2015 from @TheRealNimoy – “A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP”

For those Star Trek fans, like me, we know what LLAP stands for, and can raise a hand and separate our fingers in a Vulcanish manner. For those who don’t know (or remember), Leonard Nimoy’s final wish for his followers was “Live Long And Prosper.” And I, for one, will remember him.

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The third eye, the eye that sees into the mind of another or into the future or past, is often needed when writing a speculative fiction story.

In Science Fiction, it’s common for diverse cultures and alien beings to cross paths. But how do they communicate? A version of the Star Trek universal translator can be employed. I used a translation device in my SF short story, “Pawprints of the Margay.” But that technology isn’t always available in the storyline.

Another SF communication option is to have one or more of the characters able to read minds or sense feelings. An empath (think Star Trek Next Generation’s Troi), a mind-reader, even Spock’s Vulcan mind-meld will all do. The ability to see into another’s thoughts can be a trait of one of the races included in the tale, or a special talent of a select character or group. The singing opossum in my story, “Assassins,” seems to know what is going on in the mind of the central character, Flynn. In this case, the reader is never certain whether an animal third eye is being used, since the point-of-view of the tale doesn’t include the opossum.

In Fantasy, the universal translator is replaced by a wisewoman or wizard character who understands multiple languages (and quite often has special third eye abilities, too). JRR Tolkien’s wizard, Gandalf, and The Lord of the Rings’ elf queen, Galadriel, are examples.  In my story published in UK’s Ethereal Tales, “The Garden Shop,” the main character has the ability to speak and understand the language of plants — certainly an uncommon linguistic talent, but one necessary for this tale.

Sometimes in Fantasy (and SF) there is a Rosetta Stone that serves as a translation device. At other times, a “common” language (or tongue) that all races understand is present. But most often, one or more of the characters has third eye abilities.

In the new anthology from Dark Quest Books, Dragon’s Lure, the dragon in my story, “Weathermaker,” can both send and receive communication by thought. The young woman at the center of the short, May, speaks out-loud. She soon realizes the dragon must be talking to her in mind-speak as well as in an audible voice.

The Residential Aliens anthology, When the Morning Stars Sing, includes my fantasy short, “Blood of the Swan.” Liv, the swan-maiden at the center of this tale has foreknowledge of the arrival of Jorund, the man who comes to ask for her help as a healer. Liv not only has foresight, but also the ability to read some of what is in a person’s mind or heart. And that special ability is intrical to the plot.

Whether called an empath, psychic, mind-melder, thought-reader, swan-maiden, wizard, or dragon — it’s common to find a character with a third eye in speculative fiction. Just take a look at your favorite SF/F tales, and you’ll see what I mean.

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