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Posts Tagged ‘Short Story’

For those of you who like dark faeries and convoluted legends, here’s the link to Cast of Wonders, Episode 202, my story Henkie’s Fiddle. It’s brilliantly read by Andrew Reid (in a lovely Scottish accent). This Faerie justice tale features two lesser known dark faeries: a trow and a buggane – and a young gravedigger, an unmarked grave, a flock of crows…

Henkie’s Fiddle originally appeared in print in Alban Lake Publishing’s Potter’s Field 4. You can also read it in my story collection, Owl Light.

But for today, enjoy a wonderful reading of Henkie’s Fiddle.

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I must admit, Stephen King’s stories (whether novel-length or short story) scary me. Not just a little heart-beating-faster kind of scare, but a can-barely-breathe-looking-over-my-shoulder-and-shaky kind of scare. Which is just what a reader wants, and a horror writer strives to create.

I own, and recommend, King’s book, On Writing. Not your classic “how-to” writing book, it nevertheless is filled with information that writers will find useful. And it is in that spirit of learning that I share a wonderful article from The Guardian by James Smyth, “Ten things I learned about writing from Stephen King.”

In this article, and elsewhere, you’ll find announced a new short story contest (deadline December 18) to be judged by the master of horror writing, Stephen King himself. Interested? Here’s the link for the Stephen King Short Fiction Competition.

Good luck and keep writing!

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weston201415 365 Thanks to author Neil Weston for stopping by and sharing the inspiration for his story, “The People of the Tower.” Enjoy!

From Poem to Story by Neil Weston

‘I’m one of these writers who wants to write stories with a flowery, poetic form as their backbone. Not an easy combination to pull off, as witnessed by a well of rejections! After getting my story, “The People of the Town,” accepted into Pole to Pole Publishing’s Hides the Dark Tower anthology, using a similar format, I was finally able to breathe that this style could work. It was only my second short story acceptance and, more importantly, was an experience in patience and belief.

The story originally started as a short-form poem and was inspired by my earlier poetic creations of servile/servant, warrior Japanese Kimono Droids (soft-faced, androids wrapped in colorful, steel, Kimonos and impervious to almost any munition) and a fascination with Japanese culture, history and mystery. A Kimono Droid inspired poem can be found in issue seven of Eye to the Telescope online.

My imagination is bleak, and I wanted these droids or variations of them to be the only things to survive an apocalyptic scenario. When I hit upon a near future destroyed by over industrialization, the shaping of the tale became evident. I have a penchant for irony and was keen to see the ending reveal painfully downbeat. My favorite poets are Bukowski, Plath, Shelley and of the modern crop of speculative poets, Alicia Cole. I think they all impacted on my vision and approach and to take a chance on some beautiful, brutal words, which then inspired the shape of the landscape in my head. Thanks as well to the Internet and multitude of websites for slowing me to fine tune dress and language and food.

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000039_00001] I like my poetry to be self-contained tales, and I think practicing Twitter fiction was a perfect form by which to learn to choose words carefully. With the editorial expertise of F.J. Bergmann, you can find one of my favorite creations in Mobius: the journal of social change, Vol 24, No 1 (under Neil Weston), which provides an insight into how and why “The People of the Town” evolved in the manner it did. Even though I’m always eager to finish one tale and tell the next, from poem to short story was about a calendar year of adding, subtracting words. This was truly a tale that refused to be rushed into being, much to my frustration! But I think the end result delivers my vision…’

To learn more about Neil Weston, visit his Facebook page.

If you’d like to read more of his work, you can check out a story in Forging Freedom Dimensions and a piece of flash fiction in Big Pulp.

Thanks again to Neil Weston for his guest post. Watch Whimsical Words for more Guest Authors, Quotable Wednesdays, posts from me, and more. Have a fascinating day – Vonnie

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jgottwig Thanks to author Jeremy Gottwig for stopping by and sharing the journey from inspiration to published short story of the science fiction tale, “Who Abandon Themselves.” Enjoy!

Inspiration to Story by Jeremy Gottwig

‘Years ago, my wife (a religious historian) told me the story of the Abelard and Heloise. I’m not sure why it came up. Knowing her, it was probably just bouncing around in her mind.

Either you already know the story or you can use Wikipedia, so I’ll spare you my three penny synopsis. I will say that the story of Abelard and Heloise is sad, scandalous, sexy, and a little bit painful. It stuck with me, and years later it inspired my piece, “Who Abandon Themselves”, which is now available in the Hides the Dark Tower anthology.

Being the science fiction junkie that I am, I plucked these characters from Medieval Europe and dropped them onto different planets in a star system very unlike our own. In other words, I was not kind to these characters, but nor was their own time. “Who Abandon Themselves” focuses on a brief, fictional moment near the end of their relationship, but I envisioned a backstory that resembles historical reality. I recommend that you read my story before you dig into the facts. You shouldn’t encounter too many spoilers, but I suspect the story will be more enjoyable if you encounter these characters without context and fill in the details later.

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000039_00001] I would like to end on a personal note.

The title of my story, “Who Abandon Themselves”, is taken from a quote by Peter Abelard in one of his letters to Heloise: “The men who abandon themselves to the passions of this miserable life, are compared in Scripture to beasts.”

I love this quote, but I have to be honest: being married to a religious historian doesn’t make me a genius at deciphering religious texts. This quote feels like a moment of raw clarity in the middle of an otherwise unrestrained rambling. I encourage you to seek out the letter in its entirety if you want to see what I mean.

This reminds me of the process of writing and editing stories.

I rewrote the ending to “Who Abandon Themselves” half-a-dozen times. It had stagnated, and my cosmetic changes had little effect. My wife listened to me read and reread the thing after each little tweak. She provided honest (and brutal) feedback. My own moment of clarity came while reconsidering the relationship between my characters. Something clicked, and everything changed. I rewrote the entire ending from scratch. My wife liked it, and I submitted the story to Kelly and Vonnie.

employee01 And so I dedicate this story to my wife. She inadvertently gave me the idea, she loaned me her expertise as a historian when I had questions, and she listened to me read and reread the thing until we were both satisfied.”

To learn more about Jeremy Gottwig, visit his website or follow him on twitter and Pinterest.

And here’s where you can find his book, Employee of the Year.

Thanks again to Jeremy Gottwig for his guest post. Watch Whimsical Words for more guests, Quotable Wednesdays, blogs from me, and more. Have a fantastical day! – Vonnie

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IMG_1833 Halloween, the day when ghostly and ghastly thoughts swirl about like an autumn wind, is 17 days away.  A week ago, October 7th, was the 166th anniversary of Poe’s death in my hometown of Baltimore, Maryland. So naturally, I chose an Edgar Allen Poe quote for today.

“The boundaries which divide Life from Death are at best shadowy and vague. Who shall say where the one ends, and where the other begins.” – Edgar Allan Poe in The Premature Burial.

What a perfect quote for this pre-Day of the Dead time. In the era of The Walking Dead, Ghost Hunters, Twilight, and other undead delights. For fans of the undead, two of my zombie-ghost tales are currently available in new books. “The Return of Gunnar Kettilson” can be found in the beautifully-bound Gothic fantasy collection, Chilling Ghost Short Stories from United Kingdom’s Flame Tree Publishing. And from the USA’s Alban Lake Publishing, Potter’s Field 5 – Tales from Unmarked Graves, contains my story “Snowbroth.” (Also available on Kindle).

For Poe fans, here are some other EA Poe quotes: 30 Thoughtful Quotes from Edgar Allan Poe.

And don’t forget, I’ll be at HallowRead October 23 presenting a workshop on Anthologies at 1 PM, and on October 24 I’ll be participating on various spooky, dark panels.  Plus, I’ll be happy to sell and/or sign my books and talk to fans of dark fantasy and horror.

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Daniel Beazley

Thanks to author, Daniel Beazley, for stopping by and sharing how he looked through his older stories, re-wrote, polished, and resurrected a tale suitable for a tower-themed anthology. Enjoy!

Resurrecting an Old Story by Daniel Beazley

When I saw the call out for submissions to Pole to Pole Publishing’s, Hides the Dark Tower anthology, I remembered a short piece that I’d written way back in 2004. My writing was still very raw then, but it’s always interesting to trawl back through your work if you’re willing to brave the horrendous wreckage that normally lies in wait. However, it was only the idea I was after, and once I started reading, I knew it would be perfect for this anthology if I could only polish it into something that resembled readable material.

The anthology’s theme led me to thinking about towers in general, and I considered what it would be like if there was a great tower, but only the tip of it could be seen protruding from the ground. What horrors would lurk beneath, and what would be the reason for such a creation to exist?

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000039_00001]

Dark Ascent’ is based in a fictional land that I visualised as being similar to North America in its pre-colonial days. I have always had a keen fascination with Native American tribes, and it was from this that I took my protagonist. It follows a young brave who is on a spiritual journey and comes across a sinister scene that prompts a further investigation. This in turn leads him to a village where he discovers something ancient and horrifying, something that could threaten the very existence of his people.

I am certain you’ll really enjoy this anthology, and I can honestly say it is one of the best I have read in a long time. Vonnie and Kelly have done a great job in selecting an incredible collection of stories that will have you perched on the edge of your seats wanting more, especially ‘Squire Magic’ by Larry C. Kay, which was one of my favorites.

Sepherene

I would also like to take this opportunity to tell you a little bit about my recent book, Sepherene: The Complete Chronicles, which is a dark fantasy and sci-fi tale about a fallen angel, sprinkled with a subtle touch of mythology. If you like the sound of angels battling other angels in an attempt to save their souls, set within futuristic worlds in a time where religion is nothing more than a convenient commodity, then you’ll love this. As you can see, the cover art is excellent and it personifies the angel Sepherene brilliantly. Sepherene is available now as a paperback and eBook on Amazon.

Also if you enjoy humorous fantasy then you might like Goblins Know Best, a satirical tale about a goblin and orc partnership that follows them on some outrageous adventures. This book is available on Amazon as a paperback and eBook.

I’d like to thank Vonnie for giving me the opportunity to share with you a bit about ‘Dark Ascent’ and some of my other work. You can keep up to date with my writing and future projects through my website, facebook and twitter.”

Goblins Know Best

About the author: Daniel Beazley was born and raised in the South West of England. Growing up he became captivated and drawn into the World of fantasy courtesy of the writings of Tolkien, Feist, Gemmell, Lewis, Livingstone and Dever. These together with films like Conan, Red Sonja, The Dark Crystal, Willow and Krull, truly inspired him to want to join the creative journey that is fantasy. He began writing in 1996 whilst spending some time in the sunny climes of Sicily. This continued periodically whilst working in the Army and then the Police; living in various parts of the country as well as overseas. Daniel now lives with his family in the rural countryside of Devon.

Thanks again to Daniel Beazley for his guest post. Watch Whimsical Words for more guests, Quotable Wednesdays, blogs from me, and more. Have a darkly magical day! – Vonnie

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When I’m working on a story, I never know what length the finished manuscript will be. If it’s a “small” concept, I assume it will be a short story (1,000-7,499 words). If there’s a bit of world-building involved, even with a “small” concept, I drift into the novelette length (7,500-17,499 words). If I know the concept is a little more complicated, plus there’s some world-building, I suspect the finished manuscript will land in the novella length (17,500-40,000 words). And then, there’s that moment when a writer suddenly realizes your novella wants to leap into novel territory! (40,000+ words)

But I’m talking speculative adult (new and/or old adults) fiction, not other genres. Which is why I used the lengths in the above categories as set forth by the Hugo Awards.

Plus, you’ll see I didn’t say anything about fiction under 1,000 words. Those short pieces fall in the rather nebulous category of flash fiction. Acceptable lengths for flash fiction are usually listed by various publications in their writer’s guidelines.

Now, here’s where all this gets tricky! Each genre has different length requirements. What would be too short for Epic Fantasy, is perfectly fine for a Western. The length of a Middle Grade novel really depends on which middle grade you’re writing for. And a picture book manuscript should almost always be under 1,000 words.

Here’s a good article from Writers Digest with lots more information. Happy reading and writing!

If you’re enjoying my posts, please consider buying one of my books on Amazon, or elsewhere. Thanks.

 

 

 

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