Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘quote’

“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one.” – George R. R. Martin, A Storm of Swords (Jojen Reed)

Still re-reading the Game of Thrones books, so I thiought I’d use another George R.R. Martin quote. Both the reader and writer in me loves this quote. As a writer, you build your world and live in that world through the characters you create. As a reader, you have the opportunity to live the many lives of the many characters of the many authors you read.

What a wonderful gift books are to anyone willing to open them and begin to read. I, for one, hope to live a thousand lives (or more) as I discover the many characters residing between the pages of books. And I invite each of you to buy one of my books and discover some of the characters I’ve created.

Happy reading!

Read Full Post »

“It is our choices that show who we truly are, far more than our abilities.” – Albus Dumbledore (character), Harry Potter by JK Rowling

And there is the truth of the matter, from none other than JKRowling.

Our true character is revealed not in our words, not in our abilities, and not in our paycheck. Our choices show others who we are. And the reward for our choices are consequences. Usually, good choices result in good consequences. And quite often, bad choices result in bad consequences.

My motto has always been: Always choose kindness. And in making that choice as often as possible, I hope I show others who I am.

The characters in my stories have different mottos and creeds, and the consequences of the choices they make in my fiction are what makes the narrative. My readers don’t want to read about perfect characters making perfect choices, they want to read about complicated characters making good and bad choices – then, dealing with the consequences.

Read Full Post »

“If a child is to keep his inborn sense of wonder, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him [or her] the joy, excitement and mystery of the world we live in.” – Rachel Carson

Which is why, I for one, strive to maintain and nourish my sense of wonder. Beyond that, I try to create worlds in my writing and art which are filled with joy, excitement and mystery. And I encourage all my readers, especially those who write or illustrate, to embrace his or her sense of wonder!

For those who want to know a little more about Rachel Carson, remembered most for her book, Silent Spring, here’s a link to a Women’s History Minute video.

Read Full Post »

young robin Wood’s Edge seems to be forever white and icy this year. Just when I thought I saw grass, more ice and snow arrived. The heather beneath the front window made a valiant attempt at blooming last week, but its purplish blossoms were encased in ice, and I fear they’ll not flower again.

Though white themselves, the snowdrops usually make an appearance in late February or early March. Alas, I don’t think they’ll be able to poke their pale heads through the thick layer of ice on top of the inches of snow this year. Still I hope to spot their delicate blooms.

Hundreds of blackbirds descend daily to my birdfeeders and quickly empty its contents. Their loud chirping and astounding numbers chase away the blue jays, cardinals, finch, and woodpeckers who add just a bit of color to the white and brown landscape.

This winter, eight deer regularly wander through the woods and into my yard. As they browse the underbrush, their fur shines a golden brown when the late afternoon sun slants through the tulip poplars.

Still, my world seems colorless as children with their bright jackets, mittens, boots, and hats sled briefly, then go inside on such wet, slippery, cold days. And so, I turn to John Steinbeck for a cheering quote.

“How can one know color in perpetual green, and what good is warmth without cold to give it sweetness?” – John Steinbeck

How right he is! The bitter cold of this winter will make me appreciate the warmth of late spring and summer. And I would hardly notice the small heather blooms, nodding snowdrops, the brilliant patch of red on a woodpecker, the beautiful brown of a deer’s fur, or the brilliant blue of a hooded jacket in the lush green of June.

And for a writer on this bitter day, the arrival of an acceptance letter is all the sweeter because many rejection letters have preceded it.

 

Read Full Post »

I met Isaac Asimov many years ago at a science fiction convention called EveCon. In one panel discussion (where he was not on the panel, but in the audience), an impassioned young woman was asking the writers on the panel to create a new word for a female hero. She thought heroine was a lesser word, and read a list of words she’d come up with that were more suitable. I was about to respond (having been recently introduced at a poetry reading as a poetess rather than a poet), when Isaac raised his hand.

“Young woman,” he said, “why not just use the word, hero? I see no need for a separate word. A hero is a hero no matter the gender or species.”

My feelings exactly! And after Isaac Asimov’s wonderful answer, there was no need for me, or anyone else on the panel to respond.

Here’s a quote on writing from Isaac Asimov: “What lasts in the reader’s mind is not the phrase but the effect the phrase created: laughter, tears, pain, joy. If the phrase in not affecting the reader, what’s it doing there? Make it do its job or cut it without mercy or remorse.”

I, like many writers, need to heed these words, and thoughtfully edit my stories before presenting them to readers.

 

Read Full Post »

One of my favorite authors, Charles de Lint, writes in The Blue Girl: “Don’t forget – no one else sees the world the way you do, so no one else can tell the stories that you have to tell.”

And that’s why so many of us write. We have stories to tell born from our view of the world, and a desire to reach out to the millions of readers turning pages in the house next-door or thousands of miles away. We hope we’ll find a few souls who hear us – and understand.

Read Full Post »

tolkien On the pending publication of Lord of the Rings, JRR Tolkien said: “I am dreading the publication, for it will be impossible not to mind what is said. I have exposed my heart to be shot at.”

As a fan of LotR, The Hobbit, and other works by Tolkien, I can’t imagine him doubting the merit of this trilogy. Yet, I know as a writer when a book (or even a story, poem, or non-fiction piece) of mine is published, there is both joy at seeing the completion of a work and a sense of dread anticipating the less than positive comments and inevitable bad reviews.

Even those best books don’t please everyone, so I know there will be those readers who think my child (my book) is ugly or stupid. And though I steel myself for those critical comments and reviews, I know, I, too, have exposed my heart to be shot at.

I wonder if reviewers and readers who post reviews to Amazon, Goodreads, and elsewhere know how their words effect the author? Do you try to make your comments constructive criticism when you don’t care for a book? Or not?

Read Full Post »

13 Owl Flying extra I’m hard at work putting together Owl Light, my next collection of speculative short stories. Owls and darkness play a role in each tale. And as in my 1st collection, The Greener Forest, I’ll be using a few poems and illustrations for transitions between the stories.

While researching owls and owl folklore, legends, and superstitions, I came across lots of fascinating information. Much of that info found its way into the stories and poems.

Owl fact: While most owls are nocturnal, a few species feed during the day or at dusk. (Therefore, owl light is from dusk to dawn).

Next, a lovely quote about an owl moon: “You don’t need anything but hope. The kind of hope that flies on silent wings under a shining owl moon. ” – Author Unknown

Lastly, a poem by Edward Hershey Richards many of us have heard before. In my case, a warning issued by grown-ups, because I was a chatterbox as a child!

The Wise Owl

A wise owl lived in an oak.

The more he saw, the less he spoke.

The less he spoke, the more he heard.

Why can’t we all be like that wise old bird?

Update: now available, Owl Light.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts