Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Poetry’

rebecca buchanan Whimsical Words welcomes guest author, Rebecca Buchanan. Rebecca is the editor of the Pagan literary ezine, Eternal Haunted Summer. She has been published in a wide variety of venues. She has released two short story collections with Asphodel Press: A Witch Among Wolves, and Other Pagan Tales; and The Serpent in the Throat, and Other Pagan Tales. Her first poetry collection, Dame Evergreen, and Other Poems of Myth, Magic, and Madness was recently released by Sycorax Press.

Rebecca Buchanan’s latest books: Dame Evergreen, and Other Poems of Myth, Magic, and Madness and The Fox and the Rose, And Other Pagan Faerie Tales, are awash in myth and magic. A quick summary for my readers:

r buchanan book The world is magic. The world is stories. Dame Evergreen brings together forty poems of myth, magic, and madness, many original to this collection. Here, a butterfly Goddess weaves the world of her own color and light, a God reaches into the abyss to pull the runes into creation, a red-cloaked witch hunts the wolf who took her daughter, a turtle carries a fragile world upon its back, the doors to fairyland are tragically opened, princely spirits trapped in a briar hedge slowly go mad, and there is no happily ever after for a shape-shifting frog. Journey through a world that is beautiful, horrible, magical, and mad.

The Fox and the Rose, and Other Pagan Faerie Tales is a collection twenty stories, combining elements of classic fairy tales and myths to create a wholly original collection.

Where did the idea come from for your latest books, Dame Evergreen, Other Poems of Myth, Magic, and Madness and The Fox and the Rose, And Other Pagan Faerie Tales?

The idea grew out of my mutual love of fairy tales and myths. Most of the fairy tales which have come down to us are heavily Christianized; the Pagan elements which survive are hidden. I wanted fairy tales which retained their Pagan nature, with very obvious Gods and Goddesses and other Powers as characters. And too many of the old myths treat the Deities like jokes, or present a misogynistic worldview.

So, I started writing. When I was done, I had one poetry collection—Dame Evergreen; and one short story anthology—The Fox and the Rose.

Who is your favorite character in the book—and why?

Oh, tough question. In the case of The Fox and the Rose, it’s hard to pick a favorite. But it’s probably a toss-up between Eirawen (the main character is my retelling of “Snow White”) and the One-Eyed Crow (the messenger of the Goddess of the Underworld) in the story of the same name. I like Eirawen because she is brave and frightened, smart and a smart-ass. The One-Eyed Crow is totally devoted to his Goddess, but he also recognizes—and rewards—friendship when he finds it in unexpected places.

Is your book traditionally published, indie published, or self published?

Dame Evergreen was released by Sycorax Press, a small speculative poetry publisher which is slowly building an impressive bibliography. The Fox and the Rose will be released by Asphodel Press, a Pagan publishing cooperative, right after the new year. They specialize in Pagan and polytheist and fiction and nonfiction, in both print and ebook formats; many titles are published at little to no cost to the author as an act of devotion.

Sandi Leibowitz at Sycorax Press was a delight to work with, and did virtually everything herself, from laying out the interior to creating the cover; it was great to be in close contact with her throughout the publication process. And I love working with the folks at Asphodel Press; one definite advantage is that they understand (and support) Pagan authors. The only real disadvantage with both Sycorax and Asphodel is that neither has much in the way of PR or advertising; that all falls on the author, so sales are entirely dependent on the author getting the word out.

What is your writing process like—are you an architect (planner) or gardener (pantser)?

Both, but it depends on the type of story. In the case of poems and short stories, I usually get a scene or character in my head first. I write the poem over and over by hand, changing it bit by bit until it’s done; for short stories, I write a rough outline by hand, then start typing.

In the case of novellas and novels, I write out chapter-by-chapter outlines and in-depth character profiles. When I have a fairly solid idea of what will happen and why, I start typing. (Well, usually; my current novel project started as a single scene, and I’m working out from there. I have no idea what it will be be when it’s complete.)

What was your favorite book as a child?

Again, another tough question. 🙂 I can’t pick an absolute favorite. Near the very top of the list, though, is Robin McKinley’s The Door in the Hedge and Other Stories. It not only contains my favorite version of “The Twelve Dancing Princesses,” but also taught me that fairy tales were not just for children. Fairy tales can be dark and sensuous and romantic and filled with strong, intelligent women.

What writing project are you currently working on?

I’m working on several projects right now. One is a collection of poems, tentatively entitled Not a Princess, But (Yes) There Was a Pea, and Other Fairy Tales to Foment Revolution. In this anthology, I twist and tweak traditional fairy tales, looking at them through a more subversive lens, bringing out the elements that encourage independence, strength, and compassion.

I am also working on The White Gryphon, a heterosexual fantasy romance novel; The Secret of the Sunken Temple, a gay paranormal romance set immediately before World War II; and The Cat, The Corpse, The Cursed Ballerina, an urban fantasy novel centered around a mage of mixed Maori and British descent.

What’s the best writing advice anyone ever gave you?

Never submit your first draft.

Want to learn more about Rebecca Buchanan and Dame Evergreen, and Other Poems of Myth, Magic, and Madness and The Fox and the Rose, And Other Pagan Faerie Tales? Check out her: Website and Amazon page.

Or better yet, purchase a copy of Dame Evergreen, and Other Poems of Myth, Magic, and Madness.

Thanks to author Rebecca Buchanan for stopping by. Watch for an interview with author K.G. Anderson on January 17, 2019. Happy reading! – Vonnie

Read Full Post »

Leggere Donna Many writers look for markets for their writing nearby. They research and search for magazines and anthologies in their town, state, region, or country–which is fine. But reaching beyond physical borders can yield lots of new publication opportunities.

When your writing is published in venues beyond your country’s borders, new readers have a chance to enjoy your writing. Long before webzines offered readers from around the globe an opportunity to easily find stories (and poems) from “foreign” writers, there were magazines published in print which were open to worldwide submissions.

Studio Spring 97 Some of these magazines published in English (my language), some offered both a published English version and a translation into the language of the country in which the magazine was being published, and some translated the submission and only published the story or poem in the language of the home country of the magazine.

My thanks to the editors of these magazines for sharing my international poem or story with their readers: First Word Bulletin, Spain; Leggere Donna, Italy; Studio, Australia; Culture Cult, India; and lots of others from Canada and the UK (I’ll share some covers on another post).

So writers, think beyond your borders for markets — and readers, look beyond your borders for new writers and their work to stir your imagination!

Culture Cult Monsoon 2016 cover

culture cult spring culture cult 7 Greens Magazine Spring 87First Word Bulletin

Read Full Post »

SF Spectrum 9 Among my early Science Fiction and Fantasy publications, were poetry, art, and fiction in SF Spectrum and Macabre, both from SF Spectrum Publications, Nottingham, United Kingdom.

Editor, Wieslaw Tumulka, included my work in 8 issues of his magazines. For a woman from the USA, it was quite exciting to know her words and images were reaching a few readers across the Atlantic.

SF Spectrum 10 I felt privileged to share the pages with artist Steve Lines and writers J. N. Williamson, T. Winter-Damon, Steve Sneyd, John B. Rosenman, Don Webb, Andrew Darlington, John Haines, George Gott, and Mark Valentine,  and many more talented individuals.

In 1986 and 1987 when my work appeared in SF Spectrum and Macabre, the standard format for small or Indie presses was pieces of letter (or legal) sized paper printed on both sides, then, the stack of pages was folded in half and stapled.

SF Spectrum 12 Not very glamorous compared to many of today’s Indie publications, but this was before the advent of computers.

Tumulka, and other Indie publishers/editors were devoted to publishing and sharing the work of writers and artists whose work they believed their readers would enjoy. And in those days, there weren’t online versions and wide distribution — so a contributor “sold” First British Rights, First North American Rights, First Australian Rights, etc. rather than First World Rights or First English Language Rights.

Macabre 7 So which pieces of my writing and artwork did Wieslaw Tumulka choose to include in issues of his speculative magazines? Here is the complete (I think) list:

Poems: “More than Curiosity,” “Saturn’s Song,” “Snapdragons,” “A Circle of Pillars,” “Aware, After All These Years,” “Surgical Leftovers,” “Right Now,” and “Flies.”

Illustrations: “Skeleton in the Toy Box” and “Blooming Skulls” (a cover illustration shown here).

Prose: “Frycakes and Caruso.”

And so I conclude this visit to my past writing/art appearances with a thank you to Wieslaw Tumulka for selecting and publishing my work. It helped give me confidence to keep on creating. And a thanks to the writers and artists whose work I enjoyed in those long ago issues of SF Spectrum and Macabre.

Keep on reading! – Vonnie

Macabre 8

SF Spectrum 11

Macabre 6

Read Full Post »

IMG_1821 Today is Edgar Allan Poe’s birthday. Born on January 19, 1809, Edgar lived only 40 years, but his impact on writing has lasted much longer.

Many of today’s writers of dark fantasy, horror, and detective stories can trace their genre’s roots back to Poe. And arguably, even science fiction short stories can find a rootlet embedded in one of his tales.

I, too, have always been a fan of Poe’s wonderfully fantastical tales and lyric poetry. So it is with admiration that I say, “Happy Birthday, Edgar Allan Poe!”

For those who want to learn more, here’s a link to more information on this American writer.

Read Full Post »

Usually on Wednesdays I post one quote, or maybe a few, if I’m so inspired. Today, I give you a link to a Literary Advent Calendar and a snippet of a poem instead. By visiting the calendar each day, you can read a poem or lyrics or some other seasonally appropriate quote – even if I don’t post something.

This time of year is filled with the hustle and bustle of the holidays, family, and friends – so I can’t promise to faithfully attend to my blog. Though I will try.

Today, I will post the first stanza of one of my favorite Christmas hymns, In the Bleak Midwinter, based on a Christina Rossetti poem written in 1872 (or earlier), which was given a melody in 1906 by Gustav Holst :

“In the bleak mid-winter
Frosty wind made moan,
Earth stood hard as iron,
Water like a stone;
Snow had fallen, snow on snow,
Snow on snow,
In the bleak mid-winter
Long ago…”

along with a link to Bookriot’s Literary Advent Calendar. Enjoy!

Read Full Post »

I taught poetry residencies for the Maryland State Arts Council’s Artists-in-Education Program for over ten years to students from kindergarten through grade twelve. It was a wonderful, but exhausting, experience. The first thing I wrote on the board when I walked into the classroom was: “”Poetry excites the senses!” And then, I’d write my name.

Because of the limited number of words a poet has to express their ideas, they must choose wisely. In my opinion, the wisest way to express yourself and grab a reader is to use sensory language. I used to had out a list of sensory words for all five senses, then I’d have the students read aloud the smell and/or taste words. I still hand out that list to prose and poetry writing workshops I teach – whether young writers, college level courses, or adults.

Why? Because a writer needs to be observant. He or she needs to see, hear, smell, taste, and touch the world around them, and use that information to enrich their writing. Readers can more easily become immersed in your world when they can identify with the sensory experiences your characters are having.

Again, I’m going to link to writing friend Steven R. Southard’s blog, Poseidon’s Scribe where he discusses another way for writers to think like Leonardo da Vinci: Sensazione.

Read Full Post »

794 Little Orphant Annie by James Whitcomb Riley was one of the scariest poems read to me as a child. Perhaps its dire warnings and promises of goblins lurking near helped me behave when I was young. Or perhaps they influenced me to write dark stories when grew older.

I remember decades ago, at the annual Halloween poetry reading held for years at Liriodendron Mansion in Bel Air, Maryland, members of the Harford Poetry Society and others would turn the lights down low, light a candle, and read in unison Little Orphant Annie. One year while reading the poem, with no windows open and no living person nearby, the candle’s flame wavered and went out when we reached “A-listening to the witch tales that Annie tells about…”

Here for your reading pleasure, in anticipation of Halloween, is today’s quote, Little Orphant Annie by James Whitcomb Riley.

Read Full Post »

weston201415 365 Thanks to author Neil Weston for stopping by and sharing the inspiration for his story, “The People of the Tower.” Enjoy!

From Poem to Story by Neil Weston

‘I’m one of these writers who wants to write stories with a flowery, poetic form as their backbone. Not an easy combination to pull off, as witnessed by a well of rejections! After getting my story, “The People of the Town,” accepted into Pole to Pole Publishing’s Hides the Dark Tower anthology, using a similar format, I was finally able to breathe that this style could work. It was only my second short story acceptance and, more importantly, was an experience in patience and belief.

The story originally started as a short-form poem and was inspired by my earlier poetic creations of servile/servant, warrior Japanese Kimono Droids (soft-faced, androids wrapped in colorful, steel, Kimonos and impervious to almost any munition) and a fascination with Japanese culture, history and mystery. A Kimono Droid inspired poem can be found in issue seven of Eye to the Telescope online.

My imagination is bleak, and I wanted these droids or variations of them to be the only things to survive an apocalyptic scenario. When I hit upon a near future destroyed by over industrialization, the shaping of the tale became evident. I have a penchant for irony and was keen to see the ending reveal painfully downbeat. My favorite poets are Bukowski, Plath, Shelley and of the modern crop of speculative poets, Alicia Cole. I think they all impacted on my vision and approach and to take a chance on some beautiful, brutal words, which then inspired the shape of the landscape in my head. Thanks as well to the Internet and multitude of websites for slowing me to fine tune dress and language and food.

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000039_00001] I like my poetry to be self-contained tales, and I think practicing Twitter fiction was a perfect form by which to learn to choose words carefully. With the editorial expertise of F.J. Bergmann, you can find one of my favorite creations in Mobius: the journal of social change, Vol 24, No 1 (under Neil Weston), which provides an insight into how and why “The People of the Town” evolved in the manner it did. Even though I’m always eager to finish one tale and tell the next, from poem to short story was about a calendar year of adding, subtracting words. This was truly a tale that refused to be rushed into being, much to my frustration! But I think the end result delivers my vision…’

To learn more about Neil Weston, visit his Facebook page.

If you’d like to read more of his work, you can check out a story in Forging Freedom Dimensions and a piece of flash fiction in Big Pulp.

Thanks again to Neil Weston for his guest post. Watch Whimsical Words for more Guest Authors, Quotable Wednesdays, posts from me, and more. Have a fascinating day – Vonnie

Read Full Post »

I had the pleasure of doing an interview with fellow speculative writers and friends, Paul Lagasse and Gary Lester on the last day of Baltimore Science Fiction Society’s Balticon 49 for the audio show: Channel 37 – Serial Science Fiction from the Distant Reaches of UHF.

Alas, the only place to record the conversation was in the foyer of the hotel lobby – so you will hear people walking by and automatic doors whooshing open and close. Nevertheless, I hope you’ll turn up the volume and enjoy:

Channel 37 Audio Invasion Episode 13 featuring Vonnie Winslow Crist.

Thanks, Paul and Gary. Though exhausted after a busy weekend at Balticon, I hope I make sense and give your listeners (and my readers) something to think about.

Read Full Post »

Re-use and Recycle are popular ideas for life. Why not add Re-write and Re-think to the list, and take a look at your writing? Some of my poems and stories have been reprinted, but usually not without a re-write. Why bother with re-writing? Because I often see places I’d like to change in my writing – maybe only a word or phrase, sometimes so many changes the story or poem needs to be re-named! As time passes and I gain some distance from my writing, it’s easier for me to find the flaws. Also (and thank goodness for this), I’ve grown as a writer, and I want to polish the poems, articles, and stories that were published in the past. I saw a wonderful article with lots of great suggestions recently. Lessons from an Overcoat by Ellen Cassedy is well-worth the read. How about you? Any other writing recycling suggestions or experiences?

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »