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Posts Tagged ‘Photo’

Charles Dickens The list is long of wonderful books by English author, Charles Dickens. My four favorites: A Christmas Carol, Great Expectations, David Copperfield, and A Tale of Two Cities. Again, the list of great quotes is a long, but I think one that applies to writers and illustrators is: “The whole difference between construction and creation is exactly this: that a thing constructed can only be loved after it is constructed; but a thing created is loved before it exists.”

When I’m creating artwork or a piece of writing that comes from my heart, I’m in love with it from the get-go. Often an “assignment” is constructed, and sometimes I love the resulting painting or writing – sometimes I just appreciate it.

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Colette Best known for Gigi, French writer Colette (Sidonie Gabrielle Claudine) has many witty, and sometimes biting quotes to select from. One of my favorites: “You must not pity me because my sixtieth year finds me still astonished. To be astonished is one of the surest ways of not growing old too quickly.”

Since I turned 60 not so long ago, I’m happy to learn that others are still astonished in their sixth decade. As for me, I refuse to give up the wonder of childhood.

(As to where I got this photo and many more I’ll be using this year – I purchased a collection of author postcards many years ago. I used them as bookmarks! It was fascinating to look at the face of the writer as I read his or her work).

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Ernest Hemingway American author and Nobel Prize winner in Literature, Ernest Hemingway, wrote The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, and For Whom the Bell Tolls. One of my favorite Hemingway quotes: “All good books have one thing in common – they are truer than if they had really happened.”

I love this comment on the difference between “truth” and “facts” for in the hands of a good writer, even the most outrageous fantasy can ring truer than a factual account.

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Oscar Wilde Irish author, Oscar Wilde, is best known for The Picture of Dorian Gray (novel), The Happy Prince (fairy tale), and The Importance of Being Earnest (play). One of my favorite quotes from him: “We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking up at the stars.”

I, for one, try to always look for the stars, no matter how low I feel at the moment.

 

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Beatrix Potter I’m back at Whimsical Words after a 2-month hiatus. And I’ll re-start blogging with a new Quotable Wednesday feature.

Beatrix Potter, author-illustrator of The Tale of Peter Rabbit and other charming animal tales, was born in London, England, July 28, 1866. One of my favorite quotes of hers: “There is something delicious about writing the first words of a story. You never quite know where they’ll take you.”

For me, and many other writers, these words hold true.

(As to where I got this photo and many more I’ll be using this year – I purchased a collection of author postcards many years ago. I used them as bookmarks! It was fascinating to look at the face of the writer as I read his or her work).

 

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vcw-a-cvr[1] Hooray! My second eShort, Assassins, was published.   This time around, the short story is classified as an “Adventure” tale even though it is set in the future on a planet far, far away. And more than a science fiction adventure, this story could be classified as a Space Western!

Hmm. Does this mean I have a stagecoach rattling along a prairie trail? No, but I do have a bus driven by a reluctant hero rattling down that same prairie trail (only it’s on Konur Prime instead of in South Dakota or Kansas). Does that mean there’s a chase scene? Yes, and the get-away horse is a big-rig truck. Does that mean there’s a damsel in distress? Yes, she’s a failed genetically altered “experiment” who is running for her life from an assassin with her pet singing opossum. There’s even a saloon and gambling establishment run by a red-headed woman. And I took the cover photo in Colorado at Garden of the Gods that stands in for The Canyons on Konur Prime.

A little more about Space Westerns. These stories take advantage of the character-types, challenges, and situations typically found in traditional westerns — only they take place in the future on frontier planets or “along the trail” between planets.  A recent example of a Space Western is the television series, “Firefly,” and its movie offspring, “Serenity.” But the spirit of the Space Western was really rejuvenated years ago by movies like “Star Wars,” “Alien,” and the “Star Treks.”

Whether Assassins is called an adventure, science fiction tale, or space western — it’s a fun read. If you’re a writer — why not try and write one? And a note to you readers, Assassins has a gun fight by the train tracks at the story’s end between the good guys and the bad guys! (But I’m not telling you who wins).

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