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Posts Tagged ‘Persuasion’

Wendy Van Camp Headshot 2018Whimsical Words welcomes guest author, Wendy Van Camp. Wendy Van Camp writes science fiction, regency historical, and scifaiku poetry. No Wasted Ink is her platform featuring essays, poetry, flash fiction, and author interviews. Wendy’s stories and poems appear in magazines such as “Quantum Visions,” “Scifaikuest,” “Lit Up,” “Writing Cooperative,” and “Far Horizons.” She has won Honorable Mention in the Writers of the Future Contest, and is a graduate of the James Gunn Speculative Fiction Workshop.

Wendy Van Camp’s latest book, The Curate’s Brother, is a novel fans of the Regency time period are sure to enjoy. A quick summary for my readers—In the summer of 1806, a young curate is surprised by the arrival of his brother, who is on shore leave from his battles in the Napoleonic wars. Commander Frederick Wentworth has come to Somerset to spend time with the only family he has in England as he waits for reassignment.

All the good Commander wants to do is flirt and dance with the ladies until he is called back to sea, but when his flirting extends to an outgoing beauty that Edward Wentworth always disdained as “a child,” the curate becomes aware that his opinion of the girl is sorely outdated. Meanwhile, Frederick becomes drawn to the shy wallflower, Anne Elliot. She is the daughter of a baronet and above his station, but Frederick pays no heed to his brother’s warnings that class may prevent their union.

At the end of summer, a letter and package arrive that will change everything for the two brothers. Which will prevail? The bold action of the commander or the quiet manners of the curate?

The Curate's Brother Book Cover Novelette (sidebar)wendy Where did the idea come from for your latest book, The Curate’s Brother?

The idea started out as a different story that I called “Letters From The Sea” that awakened in me a few months after I read the Austen novel, Persuasion, and I fell in love with the characters. Most of the story was told through the point of view of Anne Elliot and Frederick Wentworth. Only the first chapter was told via Edward Wentworth’s eyes. The chapter simply did not fit with the rest of the book. One day, I thought to myself that I should take this one chapter and turn it into a stand-alone short story.

I brought this short story to my science fiction critique group. It did not go well. Half the men refused to read it because it was “romance” and most of the others flat out hated it. Only one writer thought it had promise. She told me, “the story needs ten thousand more words,” and she outlined the main plot points of my short story for me. I had a plot there. A true beginning, middle and end, but it was lacking in details.

Over the next two weeks, I wrote like a demon and the majority of the scenes were added, making the story a novelette in length. I could not get the science fiction critique group to agree to reread my story. I took it to another critique group, one that had a mix of genre. There my new story was greeted with a different tone. Most of the people loved it and several said that they felt it was ready to publish. So a week or two later, that is what I did. The novelette has done well, selling thousands of copies.

Who is your favorite character in the book—and why?

I am fond of Frederick Wentworth because he goes through so much growth in the story. He begins as a rash young officer in the navy and gradually overcomes much adversity, both emotional and physical, to become a mature young man. He grew in a similar manner in Austen’s original novel, but I wanted to showcase more of his life and the culture of the English people during the Regency era.

Is your book traditionally published, indie published, or self published?

My book is indie published. I enjoy keeping complete control over my creative products, be they books, artwork, or jewelry items. I also keep most of the profits of my sales. There are a few disadvantages in that I do need to pay for everything upfront from my own pocket, from editors, to cover artists, and formatters. Since I am a bit tech savvy I can manage to most of the work myself, but this also takes time from my writing schedule.

What is your writing process like—are you an architect (planner) or gardener (pantser)?

I used to lean more toward being a pantser when I first started writing. I still like to leave plenty of room for the characters and situations in the story to grow organically. However, I’ve learned the value of leaving myself a trail of breadcrumbs to follow as I write. In the last few years, I’ve become more of a plotter.

What was your favorite book as a child?

That is a tough one. I have many favorites. I was one of those kids that practically lived at the local library. Of course, where I grew up in the Pacific Northwest, it rained a lot. The library was a comfortable dry place to hang out in! The book that got me hooked on reading science fiction was A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The sheer adventure, the gallantry and the spirit of Dejah Thoris and Sola called to me. In my middle years, Anne McCaffrey was my biggest influence and it was a real toss-up between The White Dragon and the Harperhall Trilogy. I loved Pern with its protective dragons and the pet firelizards, but also the music. I still love Celtic folk music to this day, and I believe my first exposure to this came from Irish transplant, Anne McCaffrey.

What writing project are you currently working on?

I am in the process of finishing up my historical regency series. The other three books are drafted, they need revision and polish before release. But I do have a new potential series in the works. It takes place on the planet Mars in the near future. I want this to be more of a hard science fiction story with attention to the real science behind living on the Red Planet and focusing how it would affect the lives of those that colonize this new world. In conjunction with this new Martian series, I am creating a chapbook of Martian poetry that will feature my scifaiku poems and longer form free verse all on the theme of surviving on Mars. I tend to write haiku poems as I research a new setting for a novel. A haiku captures tiny moments or emotions in connection with a place. The poetry lets me get a good feel for a world before I start writing the book.

What’s the best writing advice anyone ever gave you?

Be consistent in your writing and get a little bit more done every day. I try my best to follow this advice, although I do take a day off now and then for family and friends.

Want to learn more about Wendy Van Camp and The Curate’s Brother? Check out her:  WebsiteNewsletterFacebook pageTwitterMediumWattpad, and  Amazon Authors Page.

Or better yet, purchase a copy of The Curate’s Brother.

Thanks to author Wendy Van Camp for stopping by. I’ll be posting over the next two weeks, then watch for more author interviews in April. Happy reading! – Vonnie

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