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Posts Tagged ‘paranormal’

Claire Davon bio photo Whimsical Words welcomes guest author, Claire Davon. Claire Davon has written on and off for most of her life, starting with fan fiction when she was very young. She writes across a wide range of genres, and does not consider any of it off limits. If a story calls to her, she will write it. She currently lives in Los Angeles and spends her free time writing novels and short stories, as well as doing animal rescue and enjoying the sunshine.

Claire Davon’s latest book, Water Fall, is a novel fantasy fans are sure to enjoy. A quick summary for my readers—Lara thought she had time to ease into her role as water Elemental, guardian and defender of the sea and all its creatures. Time to learn the skills to rise to the next Challenge, many decades away. Then she felt the shift. When Sullivan intrudes upon her oceanside sanctuary, stirring memories of the blazing night he bound her to him, body and soul, the shark king confirms her suspicions. A new Challenge is upon them. And Sullivan, the prime suspect in her predecessor’s death, demands her trust.

Sullivan remembers the carnage—human and paranormal—the last time the Elementals failed to win Challenge. It must not happen again. But in the six years since he reluctantly left Lara’s side, she hasn’t learned nearly enough to defeat a rapidly rising enemy. A gargantuan Demonos that makes him look like a minnow. Shifters don’t normally aid Elementals, but Sullivan made a deal with the gods to teach her to fight. Now if he could only convince his wayward body to put aside the searing memory of her touch. Because distraction now could spell disaster to them all.

Where did the idea come from for your latest book, Water Fall?

WaterFall_Digital_Large claire Water Fall is the third book in a five-book series called Elementals’ Challenge. Each one centers around an Elemental, who is an immortal being with powers related to their element. In this one the water Elemental, Ondine, is new to the Elementals and has to find her core strength in order to fight her enemy. I loved writing about a new Elemental, one who was human not so long ago and who had to figure out her new station while facing a great threat to the world, and to herself.

Who is your favorite character in the book—and why?

As much as I love Ondine (the Elemental) I think my favorite character in this book is her love interest, the shark shifter/demi-god Sullivan. He is a both a strong character with a core of steel but also a romantic who has wanted this woman for eight years. He does what needs to be done.

Is your book traditionally published, indie published, or self published?

This one is self-published. The series started out at a publisher (Samhain,) but they closed two weeks from releasing the second book. At that time, I opted to self-publish the remainder of the series (a total of five books) for many reasons, but the primary one is control over the subject matter and the covers. I love my covers. This series and the covers are interwoven to me.

What is your writing process like—are you an architect (planner) or gardener (pantser)?

I am a total pantser. I think about reforming and becoming a plotter, but it never works out for me. My books ebb and flow and take unexpected turns. I usually start a story by simply starting, with a general idea of what I want to write about, but no real idea of how I am going to get there. Maybe someday, I’ll plan…but I’m not holding my breath

What was your favorite book as a child?

If by child, you could say a twelve/thirteen-year-old, then hands down my favorite book was Dragonflight by Anne McCaffrey. My parents had tons of books laying around, and I picked this one up and my world changed. It was not only my introduction into SF/fantasy, but also an introduction into my own fantasy life. For years, I wanted to be a dragonrider and would invent elaborate stories around the world and dragons. I think my interest in SF/fantasy started the day I picked that book up, and it has never waned.

What writing project are you currently working on?

I just sold the second book in the Universe Chronicles series to Soul Mate Publishing. In addition, I am working on edits for the fourth book in the Elementals’ Challenge series, as well as writing a paranormal romance that is going to be in a box set the middle of next year. I’ve usually got a short story or two in the pipeline, but at the moment my focus is on the novels.

What’s the best writing advice anyone ever gave you?

There are two pieces of advice that stick with me. The first is to write every day, and I do that. The second is to write a story, send it out, and start working on a new one. Both pieces of advice have served me well. I may not always like what I put down on paper every day, but it gives me a framework to go off of. You can’t edit what doesn’t exist.

Want to learn more about Claire Davon and Water Fall? Check out her: Website, Facebook page, Twitter, Pinterest, and Amazon Authors Page.

Or better yet, purchase a copy of Water Fall.

Thanks to author Claire Davon for stopping by. Watch for an interview with author Suzanne Reynolds-Alpert on February 7, 2019. Happy reading! – Vonnie

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Thanks to Rachel MacNeill Rawlings for allowing me to reprint a post she wrote for One Story Slinger about the process of planning HallowRead. I will be among the authors participating on panels and signing books on Saturday, Oct. 26. I hope to see some of you there.  HallowRead will be held the weekend of Fri., Oct. 25 through Sun., Oct. 27.    For more information including tickets, please visit the links at the end of this post.

hallowread_red

HallowRead – The Process of Planning a Panel

By Rachel MacNeill Rawlings, author and founder of HallowRead

The panels for HallowRead, much like the event itself happened organically. From the get go I wanted all of the participating authors to be involved in the panel process. After all, if they’re not excited about the topic, no one will have a good time. Readers want to see energetic and engaging authors when attending panels. The best way to achieve that is to have the authors engaged in the process of planning a panel. This is our first year, and nearly everything about HallowRead is different from other conventions. Since I cold-called the majority of authors attending this year, we didn’t have a panel submission process. What we did have was an open discussion in the author group I created on FaceBook. I started a few threads in the group asking the authors what topics they wanted to talk about, some were more vocal than others — and I mean that in a good way! From there we expanded on those ideas, and I would post names and descriptions for the panels asking for their opinions and often adjusting according to their suggestions. Twenty plus creative minds really are better than one.

One of my favorite parts about the panels for HallowRead is the different locations. The town and its eclectic mix of business owners and residents really become a part of the event, because the authors and attendees will be moving through the historic district. A unique feature made possible by the close proximity of each location. Comfy shoes are still encouraged. All of the buildings hosting a panel – from the Trolley Stop, known in its past life as the Bloody Bucket, to Cacao Lane and Diamond Back Tavern – have a haunted history, making them the perfect backdrop for our authors and panel topics.

A panel that isn’t really a panel? That’s kind of how I feel about the SteamPunk Tea. Friday October 25th, several SteamPunk authors will be taking over Tea On The Tiber. Dressed in full garb, Victorian high tea isn’t the only thing on the menu. Authors will be moving throughout the two tea rooms reading from their novels and talking about this unique genre of fiction. A separate ticket is required but well worth the low price of admission which does include a full tea service.

And last but certainly not least is the swag! Door prizes and give-aways are the concurrent theme for the HallowRead panels. Authors have all sorts of fun things to give away. Have a burning question? It just might score you a free book or signed swag!

Whatever you fancy, Horror, Paranormal Romance, Dark Fantasy, SteamPunk, we’ve got a panel for that! So come out and join us. At HallowRead the authors are dying to meet you!

For more information about the HallowRead and/or author Rachel MacNeill Rawlings work visit the following sites:

www.hallowread.com
www.facebook.com/Hallowread
http://www.hallowread.blogspot.com/
http://www.hallowread.eventbrite.com/

http://www.rachelrawlings.com/
http://www.facebook.com/TheMaurinKincaideSerie

And make sure to follow Rachel on Twitter: @rachelsbooks

Thanks to Rachel MacNeill Rawlings for sharing her HallowRead planning experiences. Look for more guest posts, including a special Halloween series on Whimsical Words. Have a magical weekend – Vonnie

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Thanks to author Ripley Patton for stopping by and talking about the dark subjects that are often a part of Young Adult books.

Dabbling in the Dark: Addressing difficult issues in YA literature by Ripley Patton

Ripley's author photo “Even though my first young adult book, Ghost Hand, is a paranormal thriller, it still touches on some of the real issues confronting teens today; loss of a parent, feeling like the outcast, dysfunctional families, body image, cutting, and, in general, the dark hurts that lurk inside of each of us.

I’ve heard people complain that YA literature has become too dark. They ask, ‘Why all this gloom, and death, and monster stuff?’ But the truth is stories for children crossing into adulthood (ie fairy tales) have traditionally had a very dark slant, and this well may have been a way of preparing them for the fearful truths of the adult world. Story is a way of giving us a road map to reality.

What I have found is that most modern teens already know that adult world. They’re dabbling in it, or they’ve been forced to live in it long ago, perhaps long before they should have. They are seeking books that touch on the very things they are struggling with or experiencing. So, it bothers me when people try to censor what constitutes YA, or say kids of a certain age shouldn’t be reading work that is dark. If those dark things are happening to kids in the real world, shouldn’t we be empowering them to process that through the amazing meaning-making tool of literature?

Now, I don’t think that you can just toss harsh, dark stuff into a story along with some teenagers and say ‘Viola! I wrote good YA literature.’ I think there are some guidelines, and there is certainly a responsibility we have to our readers.

For example, I once read a YA book where the main character, a girl, violently beat her boyfriend around the face because he wouldn’t tell her what she wanted to know. These two characters were supposed to be in love, and I think perhaps the author was trying to make a statement about domestic violence, and how it can cut both ways. I’m not sure what the point was because the author just left it at that. The girl beat the boy, and later on they made up, and no one ever said anything about it again. The girl didn’t even apologize. When I finished this book, I found myself very upset at the author. Yes, violence like that happens in the real world without any purpose, and teens are certainly experiencing it, but her job as an author, I think, is to give that occurrence meaning in the book and some resolution in the reader’s heart. At the very least, I would have liked to see a character speak to the injustice and wrongness of beating someone you love around the face in a rage. I would have liked her to show how that breaks trust and damages relationship. Because our books are our voices, and I hope those are the kind of things they’ll say to young people.

Ghost Hand cover But it isn’t always easy to say the right things, or even know what the best things are to say with our writerly voices. For example, in the second book of The PSS Chronicles, the one I’m working on now, there are guns. Under-age teenagers wielding guns. And given the recent violent shootings, and the social outcry both for and against gun control, I found myself very uncomfortable when my characters began to take up arms. I actually stopped writing for a while and tried to figure out something else for them to do. But no, they wanted and needed guns for the plot to move forward. So, I decided to let my characters express the very struggle I was having. I gave them that voice. I let them hash out between themselves the issue, with some adamantly against guns and the escalation of violence and others strongly for that means of self-protection. Perhaps, I even needed to write this into my book because it is so in the forefront at the moment. It is something America is dealing with, and so am I, and so are our teens.

I’m not saying that an author or their characters should be preachy. I’m not saying they should say ‘This is right. And this is wrong,’ because, let’s face it, most issues have multiple sides and are more gray than black and white. But I do think we, as authors, should let our characters ask the hard questions. They should do more than act. They should think. And hope. And feel. They should process the very issues we are facing so we can face them together.

This is the magic of reading, of literature and fiction, and why we should never shrink away from the really hard, dark issues.

Because when we read, we are no longer alone.”

To read more about Ripley visit her website: http://www.ripleypatton.com/  Ghost Hand is available on Amazon.  You can also find Ripley on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/writerripleypatton  Twitter: @rippatton and Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4340243.Ripley_Patton

Thanks again to Ripley Patton for her guest post. Watch Whimsical Words for more guests, blogs from me, and my new feature, Readers & Writers Recipes. – Vonnie

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