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Posts Tagged ‘Love Story’

Romance is a sudden and miraculous grace: never to be counted on to recur.” wrote JRR Tolkien. Though one usually doesn’t think of Tolkien when one thinks of Valentine’s Day and romance, there are love stories woven through many of his tales. With a few exceptions, those love stories are intense, long-enduring, require suffering or sacrifice on the part of the couples, and have tragic endings.

“What a terrible thing to bring up on Valentine’s Day!” you might say. And though those passionate and ill-fated love stories abound in Tolkien’s fiction, he also gave us the quiet love of the hobbits, Samwise Gamgee and Rose Cotton. I think it is no accident that hobbits (Bilbo, Frodo, Sam, Merry and Pippin) were central to The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit, and it is through their eyes that the reader views much of the action.

Most of us aren’t cut out for dangerous adventures, battles with gigantic creatures, and walking for months through perilous lands over-run by armed enemies. Just like most of us aren’t cut out for romances filled with drama, terrible tragedies, and doom. Instead, we appreciate the simple happiness that comes from finding someone who cares for us and for whom we care.

There’s a wonderful comfort in the ordinariness of Sam and Rose. They love each other with the sort of love that we modern-day humans can identify with, and perhaps discover in our own lives:

Sam turned to Bywater, and so came back up the Hill, as day was ending once more. And he went on, and there was yellow light, and fire within; and the evening meal was ready, and he was expected. And Rose drew him in, and set him in his chair, and put little Elanor upon his lap. He drew a deep breath. ‘Well, I’m back,’ he said.” – JRR Tolkien, the last lines of The Return of the King.

Happy Valentine’s Day, dear readers. And may your life be filled with love.

For another Tolkien-inspired post, visit: http://ljagilamplighter.com/2013/02/13/wrights-writing-corner-guest-blog-vonnie-winslow-crist-on-writing-adventures/

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vwc-b-cvr[1] Bells, a new eShort of mine has been published.  It’s a Christmas ghost story, and I promise the names Scrooge and Marley are not mentioned. Bells actually includes scraps of “real” holiday memories and family members in addition to things that were drawn from my imagination. But that is often the case with fiction — writers select threads of factual experiences and actual people they know and weave them with dreams and make-believe. If the author works hard at stitching the two together, readers will have a difficult time separating fact from fiction in the resulting tapestry. And that’s what we want as both reader and writer, a lovely, seamless blending of ideas that takes us into the world of the story.

In the case of Bells, the reader is invited into the world of 17 year-old Melinda on a snowy Christmas evening at a family get-together in an old house in a small town. The 100+ year-old house on the corner of Park and Millstone Streets is filled with people, delicious foods, holiday decorations, family traditions, a love story, and ghosts. And I challenge you to determine what parts of the tale are “real” and which parts are purely the stuff of dreams!

Update: Alas, Bells is no longer available as an eshort — but hooray, it’s included in Owl Light, published by Cold Moon Press.

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