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Posts Tagged ‘Lewis Carroll’

On January 27, 1832, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, was born in Daresbury, England. Better known to readers (including me) as Lewis Carroll, he spun one of the most popular stories of the Victorian era, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

It is no wonder Lewis Carroll developed into a storyteller – he was the eldest son in a family of 11 children. As the eldest daughter of 4 girls, I, too, developed storytelling abilities while trying to entertain my younger sisters – so I can identify with a part of his writer’s journey.

But Lewis Carroll’s most famous world – Wonderland – was born not from telling his younger siblings stories, but from telling tales to Alice Liddell and her sisters, daughters of George Liddell. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was published in 1865 and Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found Then was published in 1871.

Though I imagine Lewis Carroll would be surprised by Walt Disney’s interpretation of his book and the more recent films staring Johnny Depp as the Mad Hatter, I suspect he’d be delighted to see his imaginary world come to life on the screen.

So Happy Birthday, Lewis Carroll! If you’d like to know more about the creator of Twiddledum and Twiddledee, here’s a link.

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Here are three marvelous quotes from English writer, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, better known as Lewis Carroll.

“It’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then.” – Lewis Carroll in Alice in Wonderland. Aren’t we all? Maybe not in the extreme way Alice changes, but we all change a little bit day to day. Before long, we’re a different person than the one that existed a short time ago.

The next quote is the best advice I can give to someone starting out writing fiction. ‘ “Begin at the beginning,” the King said, very gravely, “and go on till you come to the end: then stop.”‘ – Lewis Carroll in Alice in Wonderland.  And that, readers, is the key to storytelling!

Lastly, a quote which reflects the way I see the world, and I suspect many writers of speculative fiction see the world. “Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.” – Lewis Carroll in Alice in Wonderland. And I hope for those of you who still possess the heart of a child, that you, too, can believe six impossible things before breakfast.

Here’s the link to an interesting article on Lewis Carroll and his Alice in Wonderland books from National Geographic. Enjoy!

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Time travel is not only possible, but it occurs thousands of times every day! You see, it happens when a reader suspends their disbelief and enters the world of a story that occurs in the past, the future, or in another world.

I just watched The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian today. The film reminded me of the book of the same name, one of seven that take place in the land of Narnia. Rather than the wardrobe from Book I, an underground train station becomes the portal from England to another place and time for Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy in Book II. Only a year has past in England since the four siblings returned from The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe’s adventures, but in Narnia, hundreds of years have slipped by.

 Jubilant to return to Narnia, Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy soon discover the time discrepancy and the troubles disrupting the peaceful world they left behind. After many days spent traveling through Narnia and fighting battles beside talking beasts, dwarfs, mobile trees, minotaurs, centaurs, giants, and such – the tales ends with the four children stepping through a doorway of branches to find themselves back in the English train station. And oddly, only a few minutes have passed since they departed. Beloved author, C.S. Lewis, presents different portals in his Narnia books, but the variance in the passage of time is a common thread.

Portals are an oft-used time travel device (in addition to being quite handy for zipping characters from one world to another). Andre’ Norton used a portal to bring her original hero to Witch World. Witch World initially seems to be a place set in the past, but the intrusion of machines in the storyline makes the reader wonder if perhaps it’s a place in the future.

L. Frank Baum utilized a whirling tornado as a portal device to deliver Dorothy to Oz. After days and days of adventures, Dorothy returns to Kansas only a few minutes after she departed. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is another example of a portal transporting the hero from her world to another. A rabbit’s hole serves the function of portal for Lewis Carroll’s book. And again, only a few minutes have passed in the “real” world when Alice returns home from her time-consuming wanderings.

Like many writers before me and some writers who craft stories today, I like to transport readers into the past, the future, or to a different time in a world that I’ve built. Most often, the only portal I use is the turning of a page. The page that carries a reader from their work-a-day world to places where singing opossums or mermaids or dragons or ghosts or zombies or faeries or alien species live their lives to the tick of a different clock. So pick up a book or download a story, and travel through time!

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