Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘legends’

White ravens are rare – perhaps because the color variance makes them more prone to disease and predators. But their white feathers also seem to add credence to the myth that credits Raven with fetching fire from the sun and bringing it back to earth after the gods had taken fire away. In helping earth’s inhabitants, Raven sacrificed his beautiful plumage and lovely voice.

While in Alaska and western Canada, I saw many ravens. The intelligence in the birds’ eyes and their clever behavior suggested far more awareness than humans like to give animals credit for. I even saw one raven prying open a sunroof in order to get to a bag of groceries. And though I didn’t see if he or she was successful, it seem quite likely that the bird managed to get inside the car and pillage the groceries (including a very obvious loaf of bread) before making an escape out the sunroof.

Alas, I have yet to see a white raven, yet I love the myth associated with the creature.

Myths, of all sorts, are one of my passions. I think they add to our understanding of the people of the past, ourselves, and our species. And, dear reader, the word myth does not mean an untruth – rather a system of belief which may or may not be one you believe.

For your reading and viewing pleasure, here’s a little article on white ravens.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

For those of you who like dark faeries and convoluted legends, here’s the link to Cast of Wonders, Episode 202, my story Henkie’s Fiddle. It’s brilliantly read by Andrew Reid (in a lovely Scottish accent). This Faerie justice tale features two lesser known dark faeries: a trow and a buggane – and a young gravedigger, an unmarked grave, a flock of crows…

Henkie’s Fiddle originally appeared in print in Alban Lake Publishing’s Potter’s Field 4. You can also read it in my story collection, Owl Light.

But for today, enjoy a wonderful reading of Henkie’s Fiddle.

Read Full Post »

Wizard A brand new, myth-focused blog, Mythic Well, is up and running with a wonderful post on – what else? – Sacred Springs. There will be “articles about the myths and legends that inspire us” regularly posted by a group of writers who use myth, legend, folklore, etc. to inspire and season their writing.

So, as you can imagine, I’ll be one of the contributors. When a new post goes up on Mythic Well, I’ll link to it, so those of you who love to read about myths and legends as much as I do will have a quick way to see what’s new.

As for Sacred Springs by Jennifer Allis Provost, it’s a wonderful post filled with photos, facts, and magical information. Jennifer has also included links to some other interesting websites that offer even more information. Thanks, Jennifer, for a great debut article, and I challenge my fellow contributors to keep up the fascinating posts – I’ll sure try to do so.

So here’s the list of contributors – I urge you to check each of them and their writing out: Anthony Francis, April Wood, Darby Karchut, DC Farmer, Jennifer Allis Provost, Kimberly Long Ewing, TJ Woolridge, Sherry Ficklin, and me! 🙂

Read Full Post »

13 Owl Flying extra I’m hard at work putting together Owl Light, my next collection of speculative short stories. Owls and darkness play a role in each tale. And as in my 1st collection, The Greener Forest, I’ll be using a few poems and illustrations for transitions between the stories.

While researching owls and owl folklore, legends, and superstitions, I came across lots of fascinating information. Much of that info found its way into the stories and poems.

Owl fact: While most owls are nocturnal, a few species feed during the day or at dusk. (Therefore, owl light is from dusk to dawn).

Next, a lovely quote about an owl moon: “You don’t need anything but hope. The kind of hope that flies on silent wings under a shining owl moon. ” – Author Unknown

Lastly, a poem by Edward Hershey Richards many of us have heard before. In my case, a warning issued by grown-ups, because I was a chatterbox as a child!

The Wise Owl

A wise owl lived in an oak.

The more he saw, the less he spoke.

The less he spoke, the more he heard.

Why can’t we all be like that wise old bird?

Update: now available, Owl Light.

Read Full Post »

First, thanks to those who downloaded my mermaid eShort.  When I sat down to write the tale (pun intended), I tried to answer some basic questions: What if a mermaid baby were abandoned in a sideshow tent? Would her life ever be normal? Would she ever belong? For the answers, you’ll have to read the the story. And I’d love to hear what you thought of my plot choices. Would you have preferred a different ending? (No longer available from the e-publisher, look for this award-winning speculative story in my book, Owl Light, from Cold Moon Press).

Horned Dragon Now, to the dragons. I’m writing a dragon story and investigating the myths and legends where a dragon is either lured by milk or is pacified by milk. I’m pretty sure the old wives’ tale which says black snakes will latch onto a cow’s udder and drain out the milk originate with these stories. Have you heard or read any such legends?

And lastly, goblins have recently been cropping up in several of the stories I’m working on. I’m not sure if it’s the nearness of Halloween, or if they’re a creature that’s demanding to be written about at the moment.  Where do you think all the goblins are hiding in our world? Or maybe, they’re not hiding at all!

My thought for today: Magic is all around us — we just forget to notice it some days.

Read Full Post »