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Posts Tagged ‘Indie presses’

Ethereal Tales Special Issue All writers start somewhere. I thought it would be fun to take a look back at some of the magazines which published my writing. A few still exist (in one form or the other), some have fallen into the cracks of speculative publication history, others can still be located with some effort.

Illumen Spring 2015 But no matter the fame or lack thereof of the editors, I am grateful to them for publishing my writing. Their acceptance and subsequent publication of my poems or prose helped me to remember my words had worth, and sent me forward on my writing journey.

Illumen Spring 2010 Ethereal Tales Special Issue (includes my story, “Black Bear”) was published by Morpheus Tales as a farewell to a fine magazine which I had the honor of having had a story in (“The Garden Shop”). Illumen, now published by Alban Lake Publishing, was (along with Scifaikuest) originally published by the now-closed, Sam’s Dot Publishing (I had poems published here).

Scifaikuest Feb 2010 Elektrik Milk Bath Press published both a speculative poetry magazine, Paper Crow, (which included my poetry) and a series of speculative anthologies (which included my fiction). All of the publications were wonderful reads, and I’m hoping their editor, Angela Craig, is able to get healthy and start publishing again.

Paper Crow Fall Winter 2010 Editors of Indie press (it used to be call small press – and I much prefer the new label) publications are a special breed. With little chance of profit, and a great chance of putting lots of their own money into an Indie press to help to stay afloat, they persevere. It is through their efforts that many a writer (and illustrator, I might add) have their first stories, poems, essays, and artwork presented to readers.

Paper Crow Spring Summer 2013 A good example (in my case) were the publications edited by Jessica Amanda Salmonson (published by Richard H. Fawcett). Fantasy and Terror and Fantasy Macabre were early appearances on the other side of the USA of my speculative poetry.

Paper Crow Spring Summer 2011 But when I glance around those long ago Table of Contents, I see I’m not the only writer to have had their early work published by Jessica and Richard. Thank goodness for folks like them who encouraged this (and other) new speculative writers to keep on writing.

Fantasy & Terror 10 The last publisher I’ll mention in this post is the Science Fiction Poetry Association. Let’s face it, poetry isn’t at the top of most people’s reading list. Maybe it’s the bad poetry often force-fed to students when they’re young, but many readers grow up not only not caring about poetry – but actually disliking it.

Fantasy & Terror 9 I, or the other hand, have loved poetry since childhood. It is truly where I began my writing hobby which morphed into a writing career.

In my neck of the woods, nearly forty years ago when I went looking for other writers in the rural part of Maryland where I live, the Harford Poetry Society was it. They graciously helped me grow as a writer and tolerated my strange interest in speculative poetry – and eventually, sf/f/h fiction.

Starline Jan Feb 1987 So you can imagine my delight when I discovered Starline, the newsletter of the SFPA. I felt like shouting “Hooray!” upon discovering that science fiction and fantasy poetry was written and enjoyed by others.

Thanks again to the hard-working and under-paid editors of Indie presses. Though sunlight may have faded a few of the covers, I still treasure the magazines (and books) you produced simply for the love of speculative writing.

And to readers of speculative writing – do both yourself and new genre writers a favor – support Indie presses.

 

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Almost every writer dreams of finding an agent to represent their writing. So many publishers’ websites say “agented work only” or some variance of that statement.

The un-agented path to publication is often small or Indie publishers. There’s nothing wrong with that path – in fact for many writers, it’s the best path to seeing their books in print. Indies are more hands-on, and you can develop a personal relationship with them. The larger publishers often don’t have the time to develop a personal relationship with their writers – so many authors prefer the Indie route.

But what if you want to go the agent-larger publisher route? Where in the world can you find agents looking for science fiction and fantasy (or whatever your genre is)?

A great (though somewhat dated) source is the article, “Agents looking for Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers,” from Publishing and Other Forms of Insanity. The same useful BlogSpot site also has the articles: “Literary Agents Seeking New Writers” and “3 New Agents Seeking Clients – Fantasy, Sci-Fi, Nonfiction, Thrillers, YA, and More” and “7 Established Agents Looking for Writers – Literary Fiction, Memoir, MG, YA, Fantasy, Romance, and More” and lots more articles on agents looking for writers.

So if you’re in the market for an agent, keep on knocking on their metaphoric doors (more likely email inboxes), and best of luck in your search.

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As an author whose 6 books have been published by Indie publishers (Lite Circle Books, Vegetarian Resource Group, Cold Moon Press, and Mockingbird Lane Press), I’m always interested when I hear of someone starting a new Indie Press.

Founding an independent press requires optimism, a willingness to learn, hard work, and a love of books – not to mention luck and a little bit of money. A friend who founded an Indie press said she was motivated by a desire to publish the kind of books she liked to read. Another friend began a press to publish her own books just the way she wanted them to be published, then began accepting book manuscripts from other writers. Still another friend founded an Indie press because she was interested in books that promoted certain ideas in which she believed.

I just read a good interview of Bacon Press Books founder, Michele Orwin, on writer C.M. Mayo’s blog. I think you’ll find it informative.

For those who write speculative work, a good source for locating Indie publishers of genre books is Ralan.com.

If you want to check out my Indie press published books (Owl Light, The Greener Forest, The Enchanted Skean, etc.) – you can see them (and maybe purchase one or more) on Amazon and elsewhere.

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Vonnie at Carroll County Farmer's Market When I started the writing journey, I thought I had a clear picture of the book publishing world. Wrong!

I slid into book publishing via my work as an illustrator. I was lucky enough to stand next to an indie author in aerobics class who’d lost her illustrator suddenly. She was telling me about her plight, and I mentioned I was an illustrator. Many hours and illos later, her book (with my illos) was picked up by a major publisher, and I ended up illustrating her 8 books with Prima Publishing.

When it came to my 1st book, Leprechaun Cake & Other Tales, again I slid into book publishing. This time, I was set to design, typeset, and layout a book for the Vegetarian Resource Group (an Indie Press). The author bowed out at the last moment, and my book project slipped into her publishing slot.

Nowadays, I slog along with the rest of the small press authors. A couple of things I’ve learned: few people know your books (even if you’ve sold thousands) and even fewer know your name. You can’t convince someone to like your book, and it’s difficult to convince them to buy your book unless they already read the type of book you’re writing.

A few more lessons learned about book publishing: Friends of friends or family members will ask you to read and critique their book (for free) on a regular basis. You need to find a nice way to say, “No.” Your writing time is valuable (and limited), so you need to focus on your own writing. I often suggest a writers’ group or class for peer input.

Countless people will talk to you at an author’s event or signing about the idea they have for a great book, then ask if you’d like to write it for them. Again, the answer is “No.” If the idea is worth writing about, they need to write their own book. They’re the person with the passion about the idea – not you.

Also, people want to learn the secret to getting their book published. To which I always answer: “Hard work, persistence, and a little luck.” I wish there was a secret I could share which would quickly get their book on a fast track to publication, but there isn’t one.

And remember, free candy will always attract potential customers to your book display at an event. 🙂

Lastly, librarians and Indie bookstore clerks are a small press author’s friends. These are people who care about books and readers.

An interesting article on the subject, 24 Things No One Tells You About Book Publishing, adds to my ideas and is well worth the read.

Find my books on Amazon and elsewhere. Happy reading!

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Though the holidays are almost over, I encourage each of you to support authors (and illustrators) by purchasing their books. I’ve been published by several Indie book publishers. They’re keen on finding undiscovered writers and placing their books in front of readers.

Many of the big name bookstores chains aren’t interested in books from Indie presses. In contrast, most independent bookstores are happy to host events for and carry books from Indie presses. Here’s the link to an article listing 10 Reasons to Shop at Your Local Indie Bookstores this Holiday Season. Do you shop at Indie Bookstores or do you like to shop at the big name stores?

If you’re like me, you might like to shop on Amazon or other online bookstores. If you do like to shop at Amazon, please check out my books (and maybe purchase one for yourself or a friend).

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