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Posts Tagged ‘Helen Keller’

#2 627 “What we once enjoyed and deeply loved we can never lose, for all that we love deeply becomes a part of us.” — Helen Keller

I love Christmas–for me, it is filled with treasured memories. Memories of family, friends, church services, school Christmas pageants, snow, sharing with others, and giving without expecting anything in return. Yes, the stockings were hung, the tree was decorated, and gifts appeared beneath the tree on Christmas morning–and of course, I was excited about those things as a child. But even then, it was the other things which meant more to me.

I loved the church and school pageants and Christmas programs in which each small part seemed important, made me feel like a star–though I was not. I remember my friends who sang beside me (with far better voices) or acted beside me (with far greater skill), but I was happy being a part of the greater whole.

I loved handmade gifts–knitted, sewn, and crocheted by grandmothers or great aunts or dear friends. Each stitch took time and was made with love–imperfect, but always perfect in my eyes. Those mittens, slippers, scarves, and hats were all the warmer because of who made them.

I love cookies! I still enjoy the smell, the taste, and the decorations of home-baked cookies. I remember the exotic and foreign flavors of my godmother’s baking, the familiar tastes of Granny’s cookies, and the best efforts of my sisters and I piled on a plate in a heap of colorful sweetness.

I loved giving to others. A Girl Scout, my troops from Brownies through Seniors made gifts and treats for shut-ins, nursing homes, and “the poor.” Were there homeless shelters more than 50 years ago? I don’t know. But through Scouts and my church, I know we donated food, clothing, and toys to many. And my Christmas always felt richer because I’d shared.

But most important, I love the people who shared my Christmases. Grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, special friends–many gone now, but held close in my memory. Now, my husband, children and their spouses, grandchildren, nieces and nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews, and newer friends–join with my siblings, my husband’s siblings, and old friends to make the holidays memorable.

I loved the Christmases of the past–and they are part of me. Nowadays, I try to make each new Christmas special for those I love, so it can join those of the past and not be lost. For each of my readers, I wish love, joy, and hope on this Christmas and those yet to come. – Vonnie

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“Friendship is the only cement that will ever hold the world together.” — Woodrow T. Wilson

Friends are on my mind today. Two of my good friends, Karen and Wendy, have birthdays this week. Just last week, I had the opportunity to spend several hours (including lunch) with Patti, a friend who I haven’t had a chance to visit with in-person for two years. I chatted with dear friend Kelly on the phone just the other day. And I’m looking forward to spending time with more friends this summer.

Besides family, I think friends and their friendship are the most important thing holding my world together–which is why friendship often plays such an important role in my stories and books.

BeyondSheercliffs_Balticon Like the unlikely group pulled together in JRR Tolkien’s Fellowship of the Ring, sometimes the friendships we forge because of a common goal turn out to be the most meaningful. At their core, Star Wars and Star Trek, are also about unlikely friendships. As is JK Rowling’s Harry Potter. For “Things are never quite as scary when you’ve got a best friend.” [Bill Watterson].

The concept of friendship growing from a common goal (and enemy) led me to cobble together several groups of seemingly dissimilar individuals in my epic fantasy novel, The Enchanted Dagger (Book 1 of The Chronicles of Lifthrasir). And the idea of friendship is also playing an important role in my current work-in-progress novel, Beyond the Sheercliffs (Book 1.5 of The Chronicles of Lifthrasir). 

The fight against evil; the quest for an item or person of great value; shared hunger, thirst, and danger; a common goal; and unexpected circumstances that link characters together are all wonderful devices in storytelling that can be the seeds of friendship. And best of all, readers understand friendship. It is something we all have in common.

A great majority of us desire strong friendships. We all have known the pain of a friendship that has ended. Many of us have watched a friend grown apart from us or change in a way that makes them a different person–and one which we no longer want to be friends with. Most of us remember the joyful feelings of realizing someone has moved from friendly acquaintance to friend. And we embrace the truth of Helen Keller’s sentiment: “Walking with a friend in the dark is better than walking alone in the light.”

And so, as I shape and polish the various friendships in Beyond the Sheercliffs, I urge you to reach out to your friends. Take the time to phone, message, or better yet, visit with your friends. Or maybe, make the effort to develop a friendly acquaintance into a friend. Because “A real friend is one who walks in when the rest of the world walks out” [Walter Winchell], and we could all use more of those sorts of people in our lives.

 

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