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Posts Tagged ‘Frodo’

Thanks to author Cindy Young-Turner for stopping by and sharing another point of view on the darkness in fantasy literature and film.

Finding Hope in Fantasy by Cindy Young-Turner

cyt_photo “A guest blogger here recently commented on the dark themes in YA novels these days. I like the fact that YA literature isn’t afraid to deal with serious issues. I’ve been reading a discussion in one of the fantasy groups on Goodreads about the current trend toward darkness in fantasy. It does seem like many of the popular fantasy books are very grim and very graphic. In fact, that could be said for a lot of media, whether it’s books, movies, even music. I’m not sure what the reason might be. Maybe it’s the 24/7 coverage of crisis after crisis or the recession and fears of global instability. Darkness does appear to be all around us. Perhaps the new trend of anti-heroes in a world where there is no right or wrong is simply a reflection of our times.

I don’t mind a bit of darkness in my fantasy. I like realism and characters with shades of gray. I like the answers to be difficult to obtain, and a book that makes the reader think about the fine line between the perception of what’s right and wrong. But as I’m currently working my way through G.R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series (please, no spoilers, I’ve only finished books 1 and 2), I’m noticing that the grimness can be overpowering. Slogging through 800+ pages of the brutal effects of war on a populace and following a huge cast of characters, most of whom are pretty despicable, with the ones you actually like having little chance for happiness, makes me want to take a break and read something lighter before I tackle book 3.

TOHFINAL200x300 While I’m enjoying ASoIF, it’s also made me think about what I like most about reading fantasy, which I haven’t found much of in this series: the element of hope. Fantasy is often written on an epic scale. There might be a dark lord who needs vanquishing, a kingdom to save, an invasion to counter. Somewhere in that desperate situation, a hero will arise. Maybe it’s a hero you least expect. Maybe the hero herself never expected to be in that role, but somehow she carries on. She may stumble along the way. She may take a few wrong turns and make some bad choices, but in the end she gives the reader hope that the darkness can be turned back. Even when things are at their worst, such as Frodo and Sam on their trek through Mordor, or Harry, Hermione, and Ron facing the forces of Voldemort on their own, the reader clings to the hope that somehow the heroes will succeed, despite the odds stacked against them.

There are many things I love about fantasy, such as the amazing world building, the magic that I wish could be real, and the characters I’ve fallen in love with, but ultimately the stories that touch me the most are the ones that leave me with a sense of hope for the future. Although the fantasy worlds aren’t real, one of the great things about writing this genre is that it allows us to explore elements of our world and the human condition in a different venue. A hobbit can stand in for anyone who would rather be home enjoying a book and a pipe by the fire and instead is thrust into an adventure and a quest with grave consequences. And these unsuspecting heroes do the right thing. That gives me hope that any of us might make the choice to do the right thing.

Little Moon_JourneytoHope_CindyYoung_200x300 There’s a wonderful conversation between Frodo and Gandalf in the film version of Fellowship of the Ring that has stuck with me ever since I saw it. Frodo says, “I wish the ring had never come to me. I wish none of this had happened.” And Gandalf responds, “ So do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.”

To me, this sums up the power of fantasy. Even in our darkest hour, we can decide to find the hero within.”

Cindy Young-Turner is the author of Thief of Hope, and a short prequel, Journey to Hope, both published by Crescent Moon Press. Read more about her and her writing at www.cindyyoungturner.com. Thief of Hope is available in paperback and ebook at Amazon,Barnes & Noble, and Kobo. Journey to Hope is a $.99 ebook available from Amazon Kindle.

Thanks again to Cindy Young-Turner for her guest post. Watch Whimsical Words for more guests, blogs from me, and my new feature, Readers & Writers Recipes. Have a light-filled day.– Vonnie

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Today is the date of the Long-Expected Party for Bilbo Baggins. JRR Tolkien fans are shedding their shoes and preparing to party on this most auspicious of days in Tolkien Week. Lovers of the Middle-earth cycle know that this is not only the day Bilbo was born, but 78 years later, Frodo Baggins was born on September 22.

Brown Man 300 B&W For those wanting to celebrate Hobbit Day in The Shire manner, a party with friends and family in attendance should be held. A celebration with dancing, fireworks, tasty foods, and plenty of cold beverages held near a worthy tree is the best. Of course, no Birthday Tree can equal the magnificent tree of The Fellowship of The Ring – but even the tiniest sproutling will serve. And with a pinch of elven magic it, too, might grow to be a marvelous tree worthy of Treebeard’s notice.

Along with the feasting, watching one of Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings films is a given. Reading an excerpt from The Hobbit is another way to commemorate Bilbo, Frodo, and all other hobbits. Needless to say, both activities should be done in a hobbit-like manner: barefoot!

As for me, I shall raise a mug under the stars and salute JRR Tolkien and his son & editor, Christopher JR Tolkien. “Thanks for the stories,” I shall say. Then, return to working on my own fantasy fiction. But not before sharing a brief quote from my most favorites of books:

“When Mr. Bilbo Baggins of Bag-End announced that he would shortly be celebrating his eleventy-first birthday with a party of special magnificence, there was much talk and excitement in Hobbiton…Then Thursday, September 22nd, actually dawned. The sun got up, the clouds vanished, flags were unfurled and the fun began..My dear People, began Bilbo, rising in his place. ‘Hear! Hear! Hear!’ they shouted, and kept on repeating it in chorus, seeming reluctant to follow their own advice. Bilbo left his place and went and stood on a chair under the illuminated tree. The light of the lanterns fell on his beaming face; the golden buttons shone on his embroidered silk waistcoat…” [The Fellowship of the Ring: A Long-Expected Party].

Note: the illustration is from my book of fantasy tales, The Greener Forest. http://coldmoonpress.com/quickbuy.html

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The chilliness of late autumn has settled over Wood’s Edge. Juncoes & squirrels haunt the birdfeeders. And just a few days ago, I spent another wonderful Thanksgiving with family. This time of year causes me to think about the things I’m most grateful for. The blessings in my life are many, and family and dear friends are near the top of that list. What, you may ask, does that have to do with my writing? More than you may realize!

One of the reoccurring themes in my fiction is family. Sometimes, it’s a traditional family like the parents, children, and mother-in-law in my mermaid story, “Pacific,” due to appear in Shelter of Daylight from Sam’s Dot Publishing and my forthcoming book from Cold Moon Press: The Greener Forest. Sometimes, it’s a family of both blood relations and friends like the Chaloupek Brothers’ Amazing Oddities performers in “Sideshow by the Sea.”  And sometimes, it’s a patchwork family the protagonist builds through the course of a story.

Whether in fiction or real life, most people need security, a sense of belonging, and love. In “Blood of the Swan,” (another story set to appear in The Greener Forest) the main character, Jorund, is a member of a family and a village community. Yet while on his quest for a healer, Jorund finds he’s ready for a different kind of belonging and love. In my science-fiction adventure, “Assassins,” Flynn has abandoned the security of his mother and the family business. When he finally finds someone he wants to love and protect, he struggles to return home.

Home and all that word represents – that’s the key. Whether it’s Frank Baum’s Dorothy building a family of a scarecrow, tin man, lion, and wizard who still longs for Auntie Em and the farm, or Tolkien’s Frodo building a Fellowship who still longs for The Shire – the characters of a story can teach us about family, friendship, and that there’s no place like home.

And so, this November & December, I wish you a holiday season filled with family, whether traditional, non-traditional, or a combination of the two. May you feel secure and loved, and may you take a few minutes away from the football games and dinner table to read a good story or two.

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