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Posts Tagged ‘folklore’

heidi Whimsical Words welcomes guest author, Heidi Hanley. Heidi Hanley says, “There are worse things than living in a world of kings, queens, warriors, bards, and all manner of magical beings. After a life spent burying myself in the imagination of others and lamenting my inability to create such a story myself, I was challenged by my husband and a friend to bust down the barriers to my own creativity and just do it! I did, and The Kingdom of Uisneach Series is the result.

“I have been blessed by careers as a Registered Nurse, an interfaith minister and a hospice chaplain, but ever-flowing beneath the surface was my passion for books and writing. Whether I was writing care plans, weddings or journaling my own personal odyssey, I crafted words in ways that others found… interesting.

The Kingdom of Uisneach Series taps into the core of my Irish heritage, evoking the spirit of ancient myth and legend. I hope you enjoy this story and would love to hear from you.”

Heidi Hanley’s book, The Prophecy, is a novel fantasy fans are sure to enjoy. A quick summary for my readers—For centuries, fairy tales have entertained, comforted and inspired us. They have offered opportunities for adventure and provided hope for a ‘happily ever after’ life. But real life isn’t always as simple as fairy tales would have us believe. Sometimes the Prince doesn’t wake the sleeping princess, or if he does, they discover that they are a poor match. Sometimes the ‘Great Adventure’ requires a great deal of sacrifice and nearly kills the hero along the way. Sometimes a happy ending is a fairy tale.

Briana Brennan, aka Mouse, has a recurring dream that starts her biological clock ticking. So is the clock of destiny, started by a visit from a forest crone at the hour of her birth. While Briana is worrying that she won’t find the man of her dreams, a kingdom is worried that they’ll never see their Savior and the kingdom will be lost. But destiny has a surprise for them both. Following a sound in the woods, Briana finds herself traveling through a tree into the Kingdom of Uisneach. She is met by gnomes who have been waiting for her to come as the fulfillment of an ancient prophecy. She is destined to save King Brath from a cursed exile and take the kingdom back from the evil Lord Shamwa and Druid Artanin. With only a magic map to guide her, she begins a journey that requires her to make decisions at every crossroads. The choices she must make at these crossroads pale in comparison to the life choices she will have to make as she meets and travels with her companions, strong and stalwart, Lord Marshall Sigel, the handsome young bard, Silas of Cedarmara and a wolfhound called Dara. Overseeing the journey and mentoring her are a shapeshifting crow and a forest crone. Together they must learn how to use the black medallions each one wears to unlock the curse and release the king.

Magical maps, powerful swords, dryads, fairies, evil druids, good friends, and an Abbess, all contribute something to the journey and to her growth as a woman, a warrior and a queen. She learns the challenging lessons of love, patience, sacrifice, loyalty and commitment. The journey across Uisneach is a great adventure, but one in which she must endure heartache and physical pain, but hopefully in the end, find love and her happily ever after.

heidi book Where did the idea come from for your book, The Prophecy?

The Prophecy: Book One of the Kingdom of Uisneach Series, is my first novel. It is the product of a perfect storm of me being at a place in my life where I was either going to fulfill my lifelong dream of writing and publishing a book, or die with the regret that I didn’t; feeling like magical, swashbuckling books were getting hard to find (not true, I have since discovered); and having the niggling thought in my mind that it would be cool to write an adult fairy tale. Having Irish ancestry, I am also drawn to Irish myth and folklore so creating a world based on that was exciting to me. Someone once said if you’re going to write a book, you should write what you want to read. The Prophecy is a book I want to read.

Who is your favorite character in the book—and why?

Asking me my favorite anything is a challenge in and of itself. I have many favorites of everything. Every character in The Prophecy is my favorite for a different reason. But you would like me to pick one, so I will say Briana. Huh? That is not who I thought I was going to choose. Readers have so far either loved Briana or have rolled their eyes and picked her apart. That’s not a bad thing. It means she has made an impression and that is exactly what I like about her. She isn’t ordinary, though she thinks she is. Up until she walked through a tree in the woods near her house and ended up in Uisneach, she lived a pretty sheltered life. On the other side of the tree, she immediately discovers she is the savior to a land of gnomes, dryads, witches, druids and very mythic men and women. She must adapt to this new reality quickly to avoid being a victim of the evil Lord Shamwa. She goes from being a young woman who cries at the drop of a hat and rejects most men because they don’t meet her dreamy expectations, to a woman who makes hard, sacrificial choices for the greater good of a kingdom she falls in love with. I freely admit it is cosmically cliché. I meant it to be. I love Briana’s flexibility and her openness to seeing the world in a new way, but I also like that she is a little impulsive and has a really big heart which she often wears on her sleeve.

Is your book traditionally published, indie published, or self published?

I chose to self-publish for the simple reason that I began writing The Prophecy when I was in my mid-fifties and after several months of query letters with rejections or silence, I realized that time was slipping by and if I hoped to publish, I would need to do it myself. I created my own publishing company, Sword and Arrow Publishing, and learned everything I could about the venture. The obvious advantages are that you get the book out in your own lifetime and you have control over everything. The disadvantages are many and not to be tackled by the faint of heart. The biggest disadvantage of self-publishing is that if you don’t love the business of publishing and marketing and if you don’t have the technical skills to create and promote your book, you will spend far more time and money on the business end of publishing and marketing than you can on writing. I ended up outsourcing things like editing, book covers and formatting and website development and management.

What is your writing process like—are you an architect (planner) or gardener (pantser)?

I love that term—architect. I was taught through the process to be a plotter—forevermore to be known as an architect. When I started, I had a rough outline, based on the hero’s journey, but my editor painstakingly taught me to use chapter summaries which are a blessing and a curse. I don’t love doing them, but I agree they focus the book. However, I am also dedicated to listening to my characters, who often intervene with ideas of their own that I honor as much as possible. I believe that part of the writing process is based on planning and formula, but the fun part is opening to creative mystery.

What was your favorite book as a child?

Oh, that ‘favorite’ question again. I have been a voracious reader since first grade and choosing a ‘favorite’ book would be nearly impossible. I will say that the first books I read multiple times was S.E. Hinton’s The Outsiders and That Was Then, This is Now, when I was about eleven. It was the first time the lines began to blur between reality and fantasy for me. I fell in love with Ponyboy and sort of forgot he was a character. I remember dreaming and talking about him incessantly and being outraged when my mother reminded me he wasn’t a real person. Those books instilled in me a love for characters above all else. My primary goal in my own writing is to create characters that are unique and memorable.

What writing project are you currently working on?

I just finished the first draft of Kingdom of Uisneach’s second book in the trilogy, The Runes of Evalon. Book three is active in my head now as well. I have also been working on some poetry. Having to write song lyrics for The Prophecy was excruciating and it forced me to start thinking about songwriting and poetry. During the summer of 2018 I discovered a lyricist who inspired me to try writing poetry with pattern and beat and maybe a little less exact rhyme. I’m having a lot of fun with that and sharing it on my Facebook page.

What’s the best writing advice anyone ever gave you?

That’s easy. Embrace the editor! My first experience with an editor was excruciatingly painful, but it was also the best and most important thing that ever happened to me. I learned through Jill Shultz, a skilled an compassionate editor, that my work could only get better by listening to and working with an expert on the writing craft. My first draft of The Prophecy was a hot mess. The finished product is something I am proud of. I’ve learned so much from Jill, and would never consider publishing anything without a professional edit.

Want to learn more about Heidi Hanley and The Prophecy? Check out her:  WebsiteFacebook pageTwitterInstagram, and  Amazon Authors Page.

Or better yet, purchase a copy of The Prophecy.

Thanks to author Heidi Hanley for stopping by. Watch for an interview with author Bo Balder on March 7, 2019. Happy reading! – Vonnie

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For those of you who like dark faeries and convoluted legends, here’s the link to Cast of Wonders, Episode 202, my story Henkie’s Fiddle. It’s brilliantly read by Andrew Reid (in a lovely Scottish accent). This Faerie justice tale features two lesser known dark faeries: a trow and a buggane – and a young gravedigger, an unmarked grave, a flock of crows…

Henkie’s Fiddle originally appeared in print in Alban Lake Publishing’s Potter’s Field 4. You can also read it in my story collection, Owl Light.

But for today, enjoy a wonderful reading of Henkie’s Fiddle.

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A Night Sky with Moon and Trees

A Night Sky with Moon and Trees

Broad Universe, an organization which supports and encourages women writers of science fiction, fantasy, and horror, is sponsoring the Full Moon Blog Tour from October 25th until November 7th. As a member of Broad Universe, I’m delighted to participate, and encourage you to visit the other posts. There are prizes to be had, stories to be read, and new writers to meet.

And now, to my post, Owl Moon:

The moon holds a special place in myth and legend. Wolves, coyotes, and dogs howl at the mirror in the sky. Werewolves and other shape-changers are influenced by the moon and its mystical light. Gazing up at the moon, humans see Swiss cheese, a man, an old woman (Grandmother Moon), a rabbit, a dragon, and other images in the darker gray areas caused by craters. Beings of Faerie dance in moonlight (and lure the unwary to dance with them until they are either spirited away to Faerie or drop from exhaustion). And legend holds if you stare into a moonshadow, you can see the past.

So it’s little wonder that the moon and its magical light play a part in my collection of speculative stories, Owl Light. In fact, “owl light” is that period of a day from dusk to dawn when owls and their nighttime companions live their secret lives.

Maybe6 owl light cover Owls populate every story in Owl Light. “The Clockwork Owl” is a time-travel, steampunk story with a automaton owl who is made to save a life in the past and the future. Owls hoot from the trees in some of the stories like “Bad Moon Rising,” “Gabeta,” and “The Burryman.” Owls huddle in the corners of burial caves in ” Pawprints of the Margay” and serve as the companion of the daughter of winter in “On a Midwinter’s Eve.” In “Feathers,” not only do owls serve as mounts for fairies, but they’re able to talk and they attack an executioner ready to kill a condemned woman.

One of the stories in Owl Light where owls, the moon, folklore, and magic are pivotal is “Gifts in the Dark.” For those who’d like take a peek, here’s the Wattpad link so you can read the full story.

When it came time to paint a cover for Owl Light (yes, I am an illustrator, too), I found myself returning again and again to the image of a barn owl before an orange full moon.

Many cultures name full moons: The Harvest Moon appears in fall at the time of the harvest. Cold Moon appears, of course, in the depths of winter – as does Hunger Moon. Strawberry Moon is the full moon which appears in June when strawberries are ripe for the picking. One of my favorites, Worm Moon, is in the spring when the earth thaws and the worms become active again.

owl light cover 300 Therefore, it comes as no surprise that I named the cover painting, “Owl Moon.” What better creature to name a full moon after?

So as Selene (the moon goddess) rises into the night sky in a few days, go outside and listen to the nocturnal sounds. Perhaps there will be neighborhood dogs barking or crickets chirping, unless heavy frosts have silenced their songs. Or perhaps (if you’re lucky) you’ll hear the haunting call of an owl. Then you, too, can witness an Owl Moon.

Thanks for stopping by, Whimsical Words, and a shout out to Greta van der Rol for organizing the Full Moon Blog Tour.

Now, here’s the fun part – I’ll be sending a PDF of one of my books to one of the people who comments on this blog post.

untitled But wait, there are other prizes to be had – including books and gift cards via the Rafflecopter, and other goodies offered at other Full Moon Tour sites.

And here’s the link to visit the Rafflecopter for this tour.

Keep reading, visit my Broad Universe friends (see chart below), listen for owls beneath this autumn’s full moon, and maybe even purchase your copy of Owl Light. – Vonnie

Welcome to Broad Universe’s Full Moon blog tour, offering you a selection of the very best speculative fiction. Whether your taste is paranormal, space opera, high fantasy, gothic horror or something else altogether, please visit the participant’s sites for a taste of moonlit magic – and a chance to win some great prizes.

1. Jennifer Allis Provost 16. Once in a Blue Muse
2. The Multiverses of Liza O’Connor 17. Words from Thin Air
3. With What I Most Enjoy 18. Balancing Act
4. Life Happens. A Lot.  19. Sandra Ulbrich Almazan
5. Pippa Jay 20. Shauna Roberts’ blog
6. I Bleed Ink 21. Ripped from the Headlines
7. Clay and Susan Griffith 22. Ann Gimpel’s Blog
8. TW Fendley 23. Disquieting Visions 
9. Because quirky characters fall in love, too… 24. Bits of This & That
10. Carole Ann Moleti 25. Alma Alexander
11. From the Shadows 26. Darksome Thirst
12. The Far Edge of Normal 27. Kate’s blog
13. The Writing of a Wisoker on the Loose 28. Alexandra Christian: The Southern Belle from Hell
14. Melisse Aires ~ Romance with Infinite Possibilities 29. Whimsical Words
15. Fantasy, Science Fiction, Epic (R)evolutions 30. Musings From the Underworld

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I often write in my bio to be used at the end of a story or the back of an anthology or book which contains my writing that I believe the world is still filled with mystery, magic, and miracles. And I do still believe. But I think the number of us who still listen to the voices of the cicada and crickets in September as they foretell the arrival of autumn is growing smaller.

When the first star appears in the dusky sky, less and less of us make a wish. When salt spills, fewer and fewer of us toss a few grains over our left shoulder into the devil’s eye. And I don’t know many other people who still make sure they put their right shoe on first in the morning so they’ll have a good day.

The magic which permeated our lives and world is slowly vanishing. Perhaps it’s because many people don’t believe any more. Perhaps it’s because the hum of air conditioners and thrum of automobile’s have made it too hard for us to hear the whispers of fairies in the garden.

I’ve heard the term, Granny Witch, used to describe women who dabbled in herb-craft, storytelling, and maybe a bit of dousing. The women who say a prayer or make a wish for good health as they knit a blanket for a baby. The girls who add not just sugar and flour, but blessings, to every cake they bake.

I suppose as a teller of stories, a grower of herbs, a star-wisher, cloverhand, and knitter & crocheter of special gifts, I qualify as a Granny Witch. and I don’t think that’s such a bad thing.

Here’s the link for a fabulous essay on Granny Witches at Appalachian Ink, the blog of writer Anna Wess.

 

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Owl Light back cover This is the sixteenth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

Owl art: One of my owls from Owl Light.

Owl fact: Burrowing owls can imitate the rattling sound of an angry rattlesnake. This is a good defense when predators are around.

Owl saying: “The owl thinks her children the fairest” (Danish)

Owl quote: “Moon light and star light, owl and moth light,/ Glow-worm glowlight on a grassblade./ O Light Invisible, we worship Thee!” – TS Elliot

Owl link: Cape Coral Friends of Wildlife sponsor an annual Burrowing Owl Festival (next one in February 2015) and also provide information on their website including a chance to sponsor a Burrowing Owl. In addition, not to be missed is a video of Burrowing Owls.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.  Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

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13 Owl Flying extra This is the fifteenth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

Owl art: One of my owl pen and ink sketches from Owl Light.

Owl fact: “Whitewash” is the polite name for the white, paint-like splashes of owl poop that cover the ground, lower branches, base of a tree, or anything else below an owl roost.

Owl folklore: In the Hindu communities of Bangladesh and the Indian state of Orissa, the goddess Lakshimi is associated with the white owl – which is felt to be as an omen of good luck and prosperity.

Owl quote: “I think I’m a tiny bit like Harry ‘cos I’d like to have an owl. Yeah, that’s the tiny bit, actually.” – Daniel Radcliffe

Owl link: Lots of great owl info at the World Owl Trust site.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.  Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

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1 Clockwork Owl large This is the thirteenth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.
Owl art: One of my owl pen and ink sketches from Owl Light. I had great fun creating this “Clockwork Owl” to go with the book’s opening story of the same name.
Owl fact: Unable to move their eyes very much within their sockets, owls instead must move their heads to see. And wow do they! They can turn their head up to 270° (but not all the way around 360°).
Owl saying: I live too near a wood to be scared by an owl.
Owl link: For fans of Snowy Owls, Paul Asimow’s Snowy Owl Page is a must see, and a fact-filled Snowy Owl video.
And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

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