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Posts Tagged ‘Feathers’

Lily-of-the-Valley Fairy Happy Tell a Fairy Tale Day to all my readers. Like many of you, I fell in love with the magical, mystical, and miraculous world of fairy tales when I was a small child. And I’m still in love with this most wonderful kind of story. To celebrate, here’s a link to the beginning of Feathers, one of the fairy tales included in my new book, Owl Light: http://vonniewinslowcrist.com/stories__more/happy_tell_a_fairy_tale_day

And remember to celebrate Tell a Fairy Tale Day every year by sharing your favorite fairy tale with a child or re-reading a fairy tale for the sheer pleasure of re-visiting a charming (though often scary) part of childhood.

Here’s to happily ever-afters! – Vonnie

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13 Owl Flying extra I’m hard at work putting together Owl Light, my next collection of speculative short stories. Owls and darkness play a role in each tale. And as in my 1st collection, The Greener Forest, I’ll be using a few poems and illustrations for transitions between the stories.

While researching owls and owl folklore, legends, and superstitions, I came across lots of fascinating information. Much of that info found its way into the stories and poems.

Owl fact: While most owls are nocturnal, a few species feed during the day or at dusk. (Therefore, owl light is from dusk to dawn).

Next, a lovely quote about an owl moon: “You don’t need anything but hope. The kind of hope that flies on silent wings under a shining owl moon. ” – Author Unknown

Lastly, a poem by Edward Hershey Richards many of us have heard before. In my case, a warning issued by grown-ups, because I was a chatterbox as a child!

The Wise Owl

A wise owl lived in an oak.

The more he saw, the less he spoke.

The less he spoke, the more he heard.

Why can’t we all be like that wise old bird?

Update: now available, Owl Light.

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Angels aren’t confined to heavenly choirs and altar paintings. I believe their enchanting presence can be felt everywhere. And that’s how I present angels when I include them in my writing.

The angels in the 10th story in The Greener Forest sing in the trees. They also tell a wood-carver named Porter what to carve, and who to give his angel carvings to. Yes, I’m geeky enough to have selected Porter’s name because according to several baby naming books, “Porter” comes from the Latin “keeper of the gate.” How appropriate a name for the man whose wooden angels transform into real heavenly beings and lead the newly dead to the afterlife.

At the moment, I’m working on a story that features guardian angels. These comforting creatures are near the central character all of the time, and leave feathers for him to find as a sign that they’re watching over him. (A polished version is included in my book, Owl Light, so you can read what the guardian angels do in “Feathers” there).

How many of us have found a feather in the grass or at the beach or on the sidewalk? Sometimes I view these feathers as a gift from the wild birds that I feed. Perhaps they’re a sign an angel is close at hand. Or a swan maiden. Or even a fairy with feathery wings rather than one with butterfly-like wings.

If the feather I find is tattered or in ill-repair, I still say, “Thank you,” to whom ever left it for me. Then, I make a small wish (just in case the feather has got a pinch of magic) and place its shaft’s tip in the earth. I’m returning the feather to nature, and perhaps it will be useful to a forest creature of the animal or magical kind.

If the feather I find is whole, I thank the giver, and take it home. In my house at Wood’s Edge, I have jars filled with gift-feathers. Whether crow-black or sparrow-brown or cardinal-red or gull-white, every time I glance at the feathers, I feel blessed by the spirits of nature and the angels.

To read an early version of my story, Angels, for free: http://tinyurl.com/vonnie-angels

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