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Posts Tagged ‘fairies’

A Night Sky with Moon and Trees

A Night Sky with Moon and Trees

Broad Universe, an organization which supports and encourages women writers of science fiction, fantasy, and horror, is sponsoring the Full Moon Blog Tour from October 25th until November 7th. As a member of Broad Universe, I’m delighted to participate, and encourage you to visit the other posts. There are prizes to be had, stories to be read, and new writers to meet.

And now, to my post, Owl Moon:

The moon holds a special place in myth and legend. Wolves, coyotes, and dogs howl at the mirror in the sky. Werewolves and other shape-changers are influenced by the moon and its mystical light. Gazing up at the moon, humans see Swiss cheese, a man, an old woman (Grandmother Moon), a rabbit, a dragon, and other images in the darker gray areas caused by craters. Beings of Faerie dance in moonlight (and lure the unwary to dance with them until they are either spirited away to Faerie or drop from exhaustion). And legend holds if you stare into a moonshadow, you can see the past.

So it’s little wonder that the moon and its magical light play a part in my collection of speculative stories, Owl Light. In fact, “owl light” is that period of a day from dusk to dawn when owls and their nighttime companions live their secret lives.

Maybe6 owl light cover Owls populate every story in Owl Light. “The Clockwork Owl” is a time-travel, steampunk story with a automaton owl who is made to save a life in the past and the future. Owls hoot from the trees in some of the stories like “Bad Moon Rising,” “Gabeta,” and “The Burryman.” Owls huddle in the corners of burial caves in ” Pawprints of the Margay” and serve as the companion of the daughter of winter in “On a Midwinter’s Eve.” In “Feathers,” not only do owls serve as mounts for fairies, but they’re able to talk and they attack an executioner ready to kill a condemned woman.

One of the stories in Owl Light where owls, the moon, folklore, and magic are pivotal is “Gifts in the Dark.” For those who’d like take a peek, here’s the Wattpad link so you can read the full story.

When it came time to paint a cover for Owl Light (yes, I am an illustrator, too), I found myself returning again and again to the image of a barn owl before an orange full moon.

Many cultures name full moons: The Harvest Moon appears in fall at the time of the harvest. Cold Moon appears, of course, in the depths of winter – as does Hunger Moon. Strawberry Moon is the full moon which appears in June when strawberries are ripe for the picking. One of my favorites, Worm Moon, is in the spring when the earth thaws and the worms become active again.

owl light cover 300 Therefore, it comes as no surprise that I named the cover painting, “Owl Moon.” What better creature to name a full moon after?

So as Selene (the moon goddess) rises into the night sky in a few days, go outside and listen to the nocturnal sounds. Perhaps there will be neighborhood dogs barking or crickets chirping, unless heavy frosts have silenced their songs. Or perhaps (if you’re lucky) you’ll hear the haunting call of an owl. Then you, too, can witness an Owl Moon.

Thanks for stopping by, Whimsical Words, and a shout out to Greta van der Rol for organizing the Full Moon Blog Tour.

Now, here’s the fun part – I’ll be sending a PDF of one of my books to one of the people who comments on this blog post.

untitled But wait, there are other prizes to be had – including books and gift cards via the Rafflecopter, and other goodies offered at other Full Moon Tour sites.

And here’s the link to visit the Rafflecopter for this tour.

Keep reading, visit my Broad Universe friends (see chart below), listen for owls beneath this autumn’s full moon, and maybe even purchase your copy of Owl Light. – Vonnie

Welcome to Broad Universe’s Full Moon blog tour, offering you a selection of the very best speculative fiction. Whether your taste is paranormal, space opera, high fantasy, gothic horror or something else altogether, please visit the participant’s sites for a taste of moonlit magic – and a chance to win some great prizes.

1. Jennifer Allis Provost 16. Once in a Blue Muse
2. The Multiverses of Liza O’Connor 17. Words from Thin Air
3. With What I Most Enjoy 18. Balancing Act
4. Life Happens. A Lot.  19. Sandra Ulbrich Almazan
5. Pippa Jay 20. Shauna Roberts’ blog
6. I Bleed Ink 21. Ripped from the Headlines
7. Clay and Susan Griffith 22. Ann Gimpel’s Blog
8. TW Fendley 23. Disquieting Visions 
9. Because quirky characters fall in love, too… 24. Bits of This & That
10. Carole Ann Moleti 25. Alma Alexander
11. From the Shadows 26. Darksome Thirst
12. The Far Edge of Normal 27. Kate’s blog
13. The Writing of a Wisoker on the Loose 28. Alexandra Christian: The Southern Belle from Hell
14. Melisse Aires ~ Romance with Infinite Possibilities 29. Whimsical Words
15. Fantasy, Science Fiction, Epic (R)evolutions 30. Musings From the Underworld
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Some gardeners are practical sorts with a focus on tidy rows and neatly-trimmed shrubs. I am not one of those gardeners!

I like the look of a garden that is unexpected – one with little nooks and crannies and surprises. I have quite a few cement animals and gargoyles hidden here and there amongst my flowers. I enjoy the surprised and delighted looks on the faces of children and the young-at-heart who spot the hidden garden statues.

I’ve decided to add a Fairy Garden to my backyard this year. And why not? Surely, there must be sprites and gnomes visiting my garden along with the rabbits, squirrels, snakes, crows, toads, and various other woodland creatures.

For a magical article with pictures of fairy gardens, check out a recent post, Fantastic Fairy Gardens, from House of Hawthornes.

Happy gardening, and happy fairy watching!

 

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I’m a fan of fairy-tales, fairies, and gardens, so when I saw this charming solar light chandelier I couldn’t wait to share the link. I happen to have two solar lights (out of four originals) still working, which are just the right size. Plus, I have two metal hanging baskets which only need to be emptied of dirt, etc. All I need are some prisms, and I think I can light my garden with a pair of Fairy Chandeliers.

Here’s the link, fellow gardeners and fairy-lovers. Let me know what you think.

Have a magical day!

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Miracles, mystery, and magic are three of the best words to describe my fantasy short story collection, The Greener Forest. In The Greener Forest miracles are possible. In “Angels,” not only do angels sing in the trees, but pieces of their trunks tell a carver’s hands what to whittle away to free the angel inside the wood. In “Birdling,” a young woman rescues, then cares for a baby bird, but doesn’t know how to teach it to return to the wild. A Brown Man comes to her aid, then “blesses” her with the ability to see and hear the faeryfolk that live in her garden.

There are mysteries to be solved in The Greener Forest, too. Why do spriggans skulk about cypress knees, try to sabotage boats, and wreak havoc near the Ferris Wheel in “Tootsie’s Swamp Tours & Amusement Park?” In “Appleheads,” three kids try to figure out what creature is lurking in Miss Greenspun’s garden. And by showing up unannounced in her backyard, they discover her true identity as the moonlight filters through the branches of an ancient tree.

Magic abounds in The Greener Forest. When a granddaughter places a bowl of milk next to the pond where her grandfather believed a dragon lived, she begins a magical ritual in “Weathermaker.” And in “Blood of the Swan,” a young man searching for a healer to cure his village of an unknown disease becomes entangled in the magical scheme of a swan maiden.

M could stand for mermaid. In “Shoreside,” a ningyo (a kind of Japanese mermaid) who’s married a man and had three children with him, swims into the ocean to save a drowning boy. Once in the waves, the sea begins to call to her, and she must choose between her land-bound family and a life in the water.

M could also stand for murder. In “The Garden Shop,” a would-be thief makes the mistake of trying to rob a shopkeeper who not only knows he shot a fellow small business owner, but happens to be a fairy ready to hand out fairy justice.

And lastly, M could stand for more. Because these stories and more lead the reader into the depths of The Greener Forest, where Faerie and the everyday world collide. There is dark and light, evil and good, and uncertain dusky gray lurking in between the pages of this book. Discover that all is not what it seems at first glance, and wondrous things still happen in The Greener Forest.

The Greener Forest can be purchased at Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/Greener-Forest-VW-Crist-Amazon And please stop by http://vonniewinslowcrist.com and http://www.tinyurl.com/Fb-Vonnie-Winslow-Crist-Author

And on this most magical, mysterious and miraculous day, M could also stand for:  Merry Christmas!

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I recently guest blogged at Coffee Time Romance on the theme: “Books that Warm the Heart.” First, thanks to Tarah Scott for inviting me. When I responded to her call for books that were heart warming, I wasn’t sure she’d welcome a book with stories that feature fairies, zombies, angels, mermaids, spriggans, goblins, and other faeryfolk. But her willingness to include a fantasy short story collection warmed my heart!

I’m sharing a portion of the guest post on Whimsical Words for my readers to enjoy:

“From the cover blurb, you might not think that The Greener Forest will warm your heart, but you’d be wrong. Perhaps it’s because this collection of fantasy tales is Young Adult friendly, but each story has the happiest ending possible considering the circumstances the main character finds him or herself in.

Whether it’s a scarecrow, a giant, a hunter looking for a healer, a dragon, a half-elf wife married to a human, or a mermaid called by the sea when she swims away from shore and her family to save a drowning boy, love plays a role in bringing two very different people together. And as the holiday spirit surrounds us, who couldn’t use a little love in their life?”

And so for you writers out there — when it comes to blogging, think in unexpected ways. I bet your book, your writing process, and your life are filled with lots of ideas for guest blogs. And readers — thanks for following Whimsical Words. Please let me know what you think about my blog and my books.

To read the full guest post: http://www.coffeetimeromance.com/CoffeeThoughts/the-greener-forest-a-book-that-warms-the-heart/

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 2012 has started off with a bang! Tomorrow, I’ll be part of a Cold Moon Press presentation at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC at 12 noon. Besides reading an excerpt from my zombie love story, I’ll be discussing how to use traditional creatures/ characters from myths & folklore in creative writing. The public is invited if any of you are in the area and interested.

Again this year, my art work and writing are nominated in the Preditors & Editors Readers’ Poll (which closes at 12 midnight, Jan. 10, 2012). For those who’d like to read the story- Blood of the Swan (published in “While the Morning Stars Sing”); the nonfiction piece originally published in Little Patuxent ReviewFairies, Magic & Monsters; or the poem published this December in EMG-ZinePenelope for free until Jan. 20th, you can go to: http://vonniewinslowcrist.com/preds__eds_nominated_work

 Also nominated are my magazine cover for September 2011’s Aoife’s Kiss, the cover of my book The Greener Forest, and one of the illustrations from that book: Ningyo (reprinted here).

I just finished designing 2 logos for new imprints at Cold Moon Press – and they’ve been emailed to the editor for approval. (When approved & with the editor’s permission, I’ll give you a peek at them later.)

The end of 2011 featured a guest blog, Holiday Traditions for the Writer, on Tracy S. Morris’ website: http://tinyurl.com/holiday-traditions-VWC-blog and 2 interviews. The 1st is about being an illustrator: http://tinyurl.com/eraserburns-interview-vonnie   and the 2nd about being a fantasy writer: http://tinyurl.com/funzone-interview-vonnie

And for those interested in reading what I have to say about what goes into choosing a cover for a book, you can check out my guest blog at Morgen Bailey’s Writing Blog: http://wp.me/p18Ztn-1Fa

And now, I need to focus on completing several stories for my next book. Title and other details will be announced shortly. Till then, here’s a hint: Dusk, darkness, and owls are involved!

Here’s hoping that each of you has a healthy and prosperous 2012.

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I’m back from a week in the mountains of West Virginia, and I’m filled with both longing for the quiet of the deep forest and eagerness to resume my “normal” life. Coming home after a trip is always like that. I miss the excitement of adventure and travel, but relish the familiarity of Wood’s Edge.

 I think my writing is like that, too. As a writer, I was first a poet. This spring/summer, I worked hard on an essay, “Fairies, Magic & Monsters,” that appears in the latest issue of “Little Patuxent Review,” and on a number of short stories for various magazines and anthologies. By tomorrow noontime, I need to finish my next column for “Harford’s Heart Magazine” and get it emailed to my editor. And before next weekend, I really need to complete an article promised to an editor ages ago. Then, I suppose I’ll write a poem or two. You see, poetry for me is like a faded, well-worn pair of jeans — comfortable and easy to slip into.

 For those who might like to read a couple of my poems, the fabulous new anthology from Maryland Writer’s Association, “Life in Me like Grass on Fire,” contains “Harpers Ferry” and “Venus.” Per usual, I used myth, folklore, and legend in both poems. As a bonus for being part of the book, I got a chance to share “Harpers Ferry” and chat about contributing to anthologies at a meeting of the Howard County Branch of MWA in July. It was lovely to spend an evening with a group of enthusiastic readers & writers.

And isn’t that what it’s all about? Sharing the love of words with like-minded individuals. So thanks, MWA for including my poems and inviting me to participate in several special presentations based on “Life in Me like Grass on Fire.”

Now, back to my column…

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