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Posts Tagged ‘Edgar Allen Poe’

KellyAHarmon03172010e Thanks to author Kelly A. Harmon for stopping by and sharing some thoughts about her new novel, Stoned in Charm City – Charm City Darkness Book I. But before we read Kelly’s comments, here’s the back cover blurb of Stoned in Charm City:

“Forty dollars. Two crisp twenties. All that stands between Assumpta Mary-Margaret O’Connor and homelessness.

For the price of forty dollars, she helps archeologist Greg LaSpina find something he’s lost—and causes all Hell to break loose.

Literally.

With demons tormenting their every step, Assumpta and Greg become both hunted and hunter in their search for a way to send the demons back to Hell. One careless mistake could cost them their lives.

Wrestling with her faith, Assumpta considers as offer made by one very sexy demon: sleep with him, and learn how to rid the world of escaped evil.

But the offer comes with a steep price: her immortal soul.”

Stoned in Charm Cityby Kelly A. Harmon

“I grew up in Baltimore, and it was very natural to use Baltimore as the backdrop for Stoned in Charm City.

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000039_00001] Baltimore was dubbed Charm City in the mid-1970s. It came about when the mayor at the time, William Donald Schaefer, hired four of the leading ad-men in Baltimore, to come up with a campaign to do something about Baltimore’s bad image. (At the time, Baltimore had very little to recommend it: there was no Harbor Place, no Oriole Park, and no Ravens!)

It took only five full-page ads in local newspapers, each with a charm bracelet depicted at the bottom, to cement the name “Charm City.”

Here are some other fun facts about Baltimore:

*Baltimore is home to the Enoch Pratt Free Library, one of the oldest free public library systems in the United States. The main character of the book, Assumpta, spends a lot of time there. I don’t want to spoil it, but let’s just say she meets some very interesting people there.

*Edgar Allen Poe led a prominent life in Baltimore. He’s buried in Baltimore’s Westminster Cemetery on Fayette Street. Well after he died, his personal library of books was given over to the Enoch Pratt Library. It’s in the Poe Room at Enoch Pratt that Assumpta does much of her research.

*The first successful balloon launch in the US occurred in Baltimore in 1784. The operator of the balloon? Thirteen-year-old Edward Warren.

*The Basilica of the Assumption, the US’s first catholic cathedral is located in Baltimore. (It’s not important to the story, but I mention it because Assumpta is named after the Catholic precept of the assumption.)

*Snowballs! Or snow cones, shaved ice, or slushies—whatever you call them—were invented in Baltimore during the American Industrial Revolution. (No spoilers here, so I can’t tell you why Assumpta would be dying for one of these when she comes back from a trip…)

To learn more, you’ll have to read the book!”

Want to discover more about Kelly A. Harmon and Stoned in Charm City? Visit her website, Facebook page, Facebook Fan page, or twitter.

And you can purchase Stoned in Charm City at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, and iTunes.

Thanks again to Kelly A. Harmon for her guest post. Watch Whimsical Words for more guests, Quotable Wednesdays, Saturday Owl posts, blogs from me, and ocasional Readers & Writers Recipes. Have a charmed day! – Vonnie

 

 

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I’m a great fan of ravens – whether the Baltimore football team or the darkly feathered bird of Edgar Allen Poe’s poem. I’ve visited Poe’s grave and attended football games. One of my poems about both the Ravens football team and Edgar Allen Poe was published in The Baltimore Review and released as part of a poetry CD. Another one of my poems, Raven, is competing until midnight Jan 26th on the Preditors & Editors Poll.

I challenge Baltimore Raven fans and Poe fans to vote for my poem, “Raven,” until Jan. 26th midnight at: http://www.critters.org/predpoll/poem.shtml Let’s put the word RAVEN at the top of the poll!

And for those who’d like to read Raven, along with my nominated Short Story-Science Fiction, Weathermaker (pub. in Dragon’s Lure); NonFiction article, Tussie-Mussies (pub. in Faerie Magazine); and view my nominated artwork, Wizard (pub. in Aoife’s Kiss), – check out a temporary page on my website: http://www.vonniewinslowcrist.com/preditors__editors_nominated_work

 If you’re so inclined, you can also vote for me, Vonnie Winslow Crist, as author, poet, and artist in the Preditors & Editors Poll. Here’s the link for Artwork to vote for Wizard – you can easily get to the other categories from here: http://www.critters.org/predpoll/artwork.shtml

So thanks to all you who decide to vote. Hooray for Edgar Allen Poe, whose birthday is later this month. And Good Luck, Ravens in tomorrow’s game!

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Last night’s win was a great beginning to the football season for Ray Lewis and his team mates. And shouts of “Ravens Rule” could be heard around my neighborhood.

As for me, I was born & raised in Maryland. First a Baltimore Colts fan, I’m now a Baltimore Ravens fan. It’s easy: I love purple & black. Edgar Allen Poe is one of my favorite writers. (I’ve even visited his grave on Halloween!) A bird-lover, I feed the black birds, crows & ravens who visit my yard. And most of my family members are Ravens watchers and fans, too.

 Autumn has also started off well for ravens lovers of the reader type. Emg-Zine, an online fantasy & science fiction magazine has made September 2010 – Ravens Month. You can find raven-themed art, stories, and poems on their site. Now before you football folks go crazy – these pieces have to do with the black-feathered bird, not the lads in the purple jerseys.

Though I have written a raven poem about Edgar Allen Poe and the football team, my poem published in the September 2010 Emg-Zine issue is about the bird and a Baltimore autumn. I invite you to enjoy it & the rest of the issue for free: http://tinyurl.com/vonnie-raven  And I invite you to cheer on Baltimore’s hometown team this fall as they fight to make the play-offs.

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