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Posts Tagged ‘Charles Lutwidge Dodgson’

On January 27, 1832, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, was born in Daresbury, England. Better known to readers (including me) as Lewis Carroll, he spun one of the most popular stories of the Victorian era, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

It is no wonder Lewis Carroll developed into a storyteller – he was the eldest son in a family of 11 children. As the eldest daughter of 4 girls, I, too, developed storytelling abilities while trying to entertain my younger sisters – so I can identify with a part of his writer’s journey.

But Lewis Carroll’s most famous world – Wonderland – was born not from telling his younger siblings stories, but from telling tales to Alice Liddell and her sisters, daughters of George Liddell. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was published in 1865 and Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found Then was published in 1871.

Though I imagine Lewis Carroll would be surprised by Walt Disney’s interpretation of his book and the more recent films staring Johnny Depp as the Mad Hatter, I suspect he’d be delighted to see his imaginary world come to life on the screen.

So Happy Birthday, Lewis Carroll! If you’d like to know more about the creator of Twiddledum and Twiddledee, here’s a link.

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Here are three marvelous quotes from English writer, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, better known as Lewis Carroll.

“It’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then.” – Lewis Carroll in Alice in Wonderland. Aren’t we all? Maybe not in the extreme way Alice changes, but we all change a little bit day to day. Before long, we’re a different person than the one that existed a short time ago.

The next quote is the best advice I can give to someone starting out writing fiction. ‘ “Begin at the beginning,” the King said, very gravely, “and go on till you come to the end: then stop.”‘ – Lewis Carroll in Alice in Wonderland.  And that, readers, is the key to storytelling!

Lastly, a quote which reflects the way I see the world, and I suspect many writers of speculative fiction see the world. “Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.” – Lewis Carroll in Alice in Wonderland. And I hope for those of you who still possess the heart of a child, that you, too, can believe six impossible things before breakfast.

Here’s the link to an interesting article on Lewis Carroll and his Alice in Wonderland books from National Geographic. Enjoy!

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