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Posts Tagged ‘Charles Dickens’

Charles Dickens was born on February 7, 1812 in Portsmouth, England. And I am among the millions of readers who are grateful.

Of course, sentimental reader that I am on occasion, I love his A Christmas Carol and the transformation of Scrooge most. That said, how can any reader not enjoy his many books including Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations, Nickolas Nickleby, Bleak House, and Hard Times.

An extravagance I usually don’t allow myself, I have purchased Charles Dickens complete works – and it is with great pleasure I open the volume and settle into the detailed and sometimes grim world of Dickens.

So Happy Birthday, Charles Dickens – and thanks! For more information on Dickens, check out this link.

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794 Halloween has passed. The Day of the Dead is over. And so, for lovers of the macabre, new sources of the weird and dark need to be found!

As both an avid reader and author, I thought it appropriate to give fans of the strange a little creepy book trivia. Oddly enough, several of the entries on this list are about my favorite authors hugging dead spouses, carrying around hearts, visiting morgues, and participating in other eccentric behavior – including Charles Dickens, Mary Shelley, and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

So fellow readers, here’s the link to an article on Creepy Bookish Trivia from Bookriot. Enjoy (I think!)

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Charles Dickens is author of several books of which I’ve always been a fan.  “The Adventures of Oliver Twist,” “Great Expectations,” “Tale of Two Cities,” and “The Personal History of David Copperfield” are among my favorites. That said, it is a scrap of a book, “A Christmas Carol,” from which I pull today’s quotes.

Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” is more than a ghost tale (though there are ghosts), more than a family drama (though there is family drama), and more than a period piece (though the tale does give a glimpse into historical London). For me, it’s the ultimate story of redemption – of a seemingly hopeless cause who not only sees the light, but after his Christmas Eve adventure, Scrooge “knew how to keep Christmas well, if any man alive possessed the knowledge.”

I love Dickens’ description of that Christmas Eve long ago – one which actually fits the weather here at Woods Edge this Christmas Eve: “The City clocks had only just gone three, but it was quite dark already; it had not been light all day; and candles were flaring in the windows of the neighbouring offices, like ruddy smears upon the palpable brown air. The fog came pouring in at every chink and keyhole, and was so dense without, that although the court was of the narrowest, the houses opposite were mere phantoms.”

But I suppose the quote I like best for today, one which works as both a promise for me to keep the kindness of Christmas year-round and a wish for you to do the same: “I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach…A Merry Christmas to everybody! A Happy New Year to all the world.”

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Charles Dickens The list is long of wonderful books by English author, Charles Dickens. My four favorites: A Christmas Carol, Great Expectations, David Copperfield, and A Tale of Two Cities. Again, the list of great quotes is a long, but I think one that applies to writers and illustrators is: “The whole difference between construction and creation is exactly this: that a thing constructed can only be loved after it is constructed; but a thing created is loved before it exists.”

When I’m creating artwork or a piece of writing that comes from my heart, I’m in love with it from the get-go. Often an “assignment” is constructed, and sometimes I love the resulting painting or writing – sometimes I just appreciate it.

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The theme of the upcoming issue of the Maryland-based literary magazine, Little Patuxent Review, is “Make Believe.”  I’m delighted to say I’ll have an essay titled, “Fairy Stories, Magic, and Monsters,” in that issue.

Though I need to address Editor Laura’s suggestions, the essay will remain much as I first wrote it. In examining our enduring fascination with fantasy, I was able to use examples from stories by J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, L. Frank Baum, J.K. Rowling, the Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen, Neil Gaiman, Marion Zimmer Bradley, Nancy Werlin, March Cost, and Charles Dickens. But I could have written a much longer, more involved essay which included the work of dozens of other authors who’ve given readers magical worlds to inhabit as they turned the pages of a book.

 In my new book, The Greener Forest, I tried to bring a bit of that magic to my readers. Have I succeeded? Only time will tell. But I did receive my first email from someone who bought a copy of The Greener Forest, reprinted here with permission:

“Hello! I bought a copy of your book at the Mythic Faire in Maryland.  I finished it in one sitting–I couldn’t put it down.  Thanks for an enjoyable read; your stories were sincere &  full of wonder and joy. Keep up the great work! — K. Masters”

And thank you, K. Masters, for your note. Writing is a solitary passion and it’s nice to know that someone besides your editor enjoys the fantasy worlds you’ve created. Want your copy of The Greener Forest? Visit: http://coldmoonpress.com/quickbuy.html  And remember, the world is full of mystery & magic. We just need to look, listen, and believe that wondrous things are still possible.

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