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Posts Tagged ‘Barnes & Noble’

cinder I’ve never tried to write a novel in November (National Novel Writing Month), but I cheer on my writer friends who make the attempt. And I salute those persistent friends who manage to complete a novel in a month’s time.

I’ve heard all the doubting Thomases and Thomasinas who say, “Why bother? Nothing good comes of writing a novel in thirty days.”

Actually, they’re wrong! Many NaNoWriMo novels prove quite successful, including one of my favorites, Cinder, by Marissa Meyer. Here’s the link to: Seven YA Must Reads That Started As NaNoWriMo Projects from the Barnes & Noble Teen Blog if you want to read more.

So keep on writing NaNoWriMo challenge-takers. I wish you success, and admire your dedication.

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Sandra Saidak Thanks to fantasy author Sandra Saidak for stopping by and sharing how she’s used folklore in her writing. (As my readers know, this is a subject near and dear to my heart, too!)

Using Folklore in Writing Fantasy by Sandra Saidak

I guess I’ve always known about the shapeshifting seals called selkies. I’d heard at least a couple of old ballads, and even seen one printed up in a Beauty and the Beast fanzine. But when I began writing the story which eventually became The Seal Queen, I knew that selkies weren’t quite what I was looking for. I knew I needed some kind of animal shapeshifter, and since the book was going to take place on the southern coast of Ireland, seals certainly made the most sense.

It was while sitting in a Barnes and Noble with a hot chocolate and a copy of The Element Encyclopedia of Magical Creatures by John and Caitlin Matthews, (a wonderful book, which I could not possibly have afforded at the time) that I discovered the roane. While similar to selkies, and just as likely to have their fur stolen and forced to become the wife of some fisherman, these gentle creatures were much more like what I was looking for.

I searched for more information, but could only find one folktale involving the roane, which I will briefly paraphrase here:

A seal trapper lost his knife while attempting to kill a bull-seal. That night, a stranger came to his door, asking to purchase a large number of seal skins. The trapper gathered together a sizable bundle, and while loading them onto the stranger’s horse, found himself pulled onto the horse behind the stranger, who at once rode them to the edge of a cliff—then over it, into the sea.

The trapper found himself in the sea cave of the roane. he stranger, who was actually a roane in human form, was now a seal. Gathered in the cave was a sorrowing group of roane, who surrounded an injured bull-seal. One of them, in human form, held a knife, and asked the trapper if it was his. Terrified, the trapper could only nod. Then, to his amazement, the roane handed him his knife and told him the seal could be saved if the trapper would draw a circle around the wound with the knife, smooth it with his hand, and pray for it to be healed.

The trapper did so, and before his eyes the wound closed and soon disappeared. The trapper swore an oath never to harm another seal and was taken home.

As soon as I read the story, I knew two things: these were the creatures I was looking for, and this tale would appear in my novel. So far, all I had of that novel was a scene in which a pregnant woman was fleeing an abusive situation, and then arriving on an enchanted beach where she could finally feel safe. There, she would begin to discover her own strength and resourcefulness. The themes I saw in the folktale—forgiveness, hope, redemption and healing magic—resonated so strongly that I knew this one little story would shape my entire novel. You can find my version of the tale in Chapter 22 of The Seal Queen.

Sandra Saidak The Seal Queen The Seal Queen’s Cover Blurb: “Drawing on Irish folklore, The Seal Queen tells the story of Briah, an escaped slave who finds sanctuary, for herself and her unborn child, on an enchanted beach. There her life is filled with contented solitude, the joys of motherhood, and even the possibility of love with a merman whose song haunts her dreams.

But Briah’s magical world is shaken when she discovers that her son is the long-awaited savior and future king of the roane (shape-shifting seals, and gentler cousins of the selkies). Briah wants to help these magical creatures, but is unwilling to see her son become a pawn in their deadly schemes. When faced with the choice between sending her child to battle his diabolical father or allowing the roane to be exterminated, Briah insists on finding a third option.”

Find out more about Sandra Saidak by visiting her on Facebook (Sandra Saidak) and checking out her website: http://sandrasaidak.com/

Her books can be purchased on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Sandra-Saidak/e/B006C1QZR8/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1 Including not only The Seal Queen, but also Sandra’s prehistoric fiction series, Kalie’s Journey, beginning with Daughter of theGoddess Lands, an epic set in the late Neolithic Age and continued in Shadow of the Horsemen. And a story set in the Kalie universe can be found in Sandra’s short story collection, In the Balance.

Thanks again to Sandra Saidak for her guest post. Watch Whimsical Words for more guests, blogs from me, and Readers & Writers Recipes. Have a magical day! – Vonnie

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I’ve been taking time out from writing to do some drawing & painting. I finished a fantasy watercolor painted in various pinks, blues, and purples called Poet’s Moon, then sent a bit of it off to an editor for cover art consideration. That bit will be the cover of the February 2012 Scifaikuest.

I drew a pen & ink, faeriefolk-infested maze for BSFAN, Balticon’s souvenir book to promote my book from Cold Moon Press: The Greener Forest. (I’ve received positive feedback from a number of attendees on the maze). I painted a sweet little fairy, “Crocus,” for an ad in the next Faerie Magazine. Plus, she’ll be matted & framed for an upcoming art exhibit – I’ll have to let you know after it’s published what folks think.

I painted 2 gouaches “on spec” for the cover of an upcoming speculative fiction anthology: Rush of Wings. (Hmm, I’m not sure if that’s the true plural for more than 1 gouache — that strange child of watercolor & acrylic paints). One painting, “Rush of Wings,” was declined, and I’ve since sent it out to another editor for another project. The other, “The Golden Egg,” is still being held by the RoW editor. Both speculative paintings just sold from an art exhibit I have at Bel Air Barnes & Noble (MD) for June 1-30, 2011.

Two other paintings have also just sold “off the wall” of my local Barnes & Noble: “Mermaid & Friends,” the cover art for my eShort Sideshow by the Sea, (soon to be included in my new book) and “Three Dwarves,” a watercolor used as cover art by the now defunct Lite – Baltimore’s Literary Magazine. For those interested, you can see the mermaid painting and also, “Acorn Sprite,” a small painting that another buyer has expressed interest in purchasing when the B&N show ends — at the art-gifts on this blog: https://vonniewinslowcrist.wordpress.com/art-gifts/

 I sent the 2 gouaches (mentioned in paragraph #2) plus a watercolor called “Strawberry Dragon” off to my local Society of Book Writers & Illustrators annual Jack Reid Scholarship for free tuition to their July conference. And, gulp, I won the illustrator’s scholarship, so my $195 tuition is being waived!

So what does this “sudden” artwork success mean? Should I stop writing and devote myself to illustration? I think not! I believe these positive responses to my artwork tell me the hours, days, weeks — actually years — that I’ve spent painting and studying art are being acknowledged. Practice has helped me to get better.

I’ll continue to practice my painting and my writing this summer. Hopefully, I’ll have good news in both disciplines. But most importantly, I hope to grow and improve so I can bring my readers better stories and more powerful art in the future. And I encourage all of you to practice whatever it is that you enjoy doing — and I bet you’ll see an improvement in your skill-level, too!

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