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Posts Tagged ‘American writer’

November 30, 1835 was the birth date of Samuel L. Clemens, known by most by his “writing name” – Mark Twain.

He was a favorite author of mine as a younger reader, and continues to be one of the writers I revisit on a regular basis. In my mind’s eye, I picture the episode in Tom Sawyer where Tom feeds Aunt Polly’s cat some medicine – and I still laugh out loud! And though the book has become controversial due to its language, I’ve always felt the complicate portraits of Huck and Jim and questions put forth about slavery in Huckleberry Finn make it a must-read book.

I had the pleasure of visiting Hannibal, Missouri this year and seeing many of the locations made famous by Mark Twain’s books. The town was charming, and its museum on Samuel Clemens/Mark Twain fascinating.

I think Mark Twain deserves the label “Father of American Literature” which is often attached to this son of Florida, Missouri.

For more information, here’s the link to a video about his life.

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IMG_1833“I wish I could write as mysterious as a cat.” – Edgar Allan Poe

Viewed as a master of the macabre, Poe recognized that a feline was by nature (and when magnified by human imagination) more mysterious than most writers can ever hope to be. I love the simplicity of the quote – and its truth.

IMG_1803 For those who’ve never been, I recommend a trip to the Poe House and burial sites in Baltimore (where the pictures were taken).

And for Poe fans, here’s a link to some little known Edgar Allan Poe facts. IMG_1821

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Harriet Beecher Stowe American writer, Harriet Beecher Stowe, who stirred up abolitionist feelings a decade before the Civil War with her book, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, offers insightful bits of wisdom. One of my favorites: “When you get into a tight place and everything goes against you, till it seems as though you could not hang on a minute longer, never give up then, for that is just the place and time that the tide will turn.”

I often wonder how many books go unpublished, how many inventions rust away, and how many miracles never happen because people give up too soon. An optimist at heart, I always hope the next envelope (or email) I open will contain an acceptance letter rather than a rejection slip.

 

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