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Posts Tagged ‘A Game of Thrones’

I won’t support myself or become rich from writing. Most writers I know won’t make a living from writing or become rich. But sometimes I think the public believes writers make lots of money. Wrong!

Stephen King (It, Carrie, Cujo, Thinner, etc.) makes lots of money (but remember, some of that is from television and movies, not just books). JK Rowling, of Harry Potter fame, makes lots of money (some of that is from movies and merchandise). And a few other writers are doing very well financially with their books and television, films, and merchandise based on their books. They are the exceptions.

For every George R.R. Martin, of A Game of Thrones fame, there are thousands of writers who won’t make $100 per year from their writing. Especially if an author is self-published or published by a small independent press, he or she will likely make little more than the price of Happy Meal or two. Which is why most authors write because they love the written word, they love books, and/or they’re looking for a vehicle to tell the stories rattling around in their heads.

Here’s the link to an interesting blog post from Steve Laube (of The Steve Laube Agency) which explores: Most Writers Don’t Make A Lot of Money.

And if you’re motivated to support this author, here’s the link to my Amazon page. 🙂

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‘”There,” Jon said. He swung his horse around and galloped back across the bridge. They watched him dismount where the direwolf lay dead in the snow, watching him kneel. A moment later he was riding back to them, smiling.

“He must have crawled away from the others,” Jon said.

“Or been driven away,” their father said, looking at the sixth pup. His fur was white, where the rest of the litter was grey. His eyes were as red as the blood of the ragged man who had died that morning. Bran thought it curious that this pup alone would have opened his eyes while the others were still blind.’ — George R.R. Martin, A Game of Thrones

I’m a fan of George R.R. Martin’s writing. In this seemingly small exchange from the beginning of the first book in the Song of Ice and Fire series, the reader learns a lot about the children of Ned Stark. Since the direwolves are each given to one of Ned’s children, the quote seems to say that Jon is a Stark, too, and that he’s the only one who will see when his “brothers” and “sisters” are still blind. Hmm!

But that’s not why I picked a George R.R. Martin quote. I was pointed to an interesting article about the opening of a novel by fellow Broad Universe member, Greta van der Rol. In Myth #3 – ‘You have to know your “story problem” and “protagonist’s problem” before you start,’ the old terms “planners” and “pantsers” are used. I’ve never been a fan of those terms, and found the terms used by George R.R. Martin in that paragraph, “architects and gardeners,” more appealing and more accurate.

I count myself among the “gardeners,” because I, like Martin, plant a seed with just an idea of what the seed might become.

So for all you architects (outliners and planners), gardeners (those who write by the seat of their pants), and readers who enjoy understanding the inner workings of writing – check out Lit Reactor’s What Every Successful Novel Opening Must Do: Myth vs. Reality by Susan Defreitas. Let me know what you think!

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“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one.” – George R. R. Martin, A Storm of Swords (Jojen Reed)

Still re-reading the Game of Thrones books, so I thiought I’d use another George R.R. Martin quote. Both the reader and writer in me loves this quote. As a writer, you build your world and live in that world through the characters you create. As a reader, you have the opportunity to live the many lives of the many characters of the many authors you read.

What a wonderful gift books are to anyone willing to open them and begin to read. I, for one, hope to live a thousand lives (or more) as I discover the many characters residing between the pages of books. And I invite each of you to buy one of my books and discover some of the characters I’ve created.

Happy reading!

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“Bran thought about it. ‘Can a man still be brave if he’s afraid?’
‘That is the only time a man can be brave,’ his father told him.”
– George R. R. Martin, A Game of Thrones

Still reading the Game of Thrones books and hoping to see a new book published in the not too distant future. George Martin is a wonderful stroyteller, whether you choose to delve into his world or not. Yes, there’s violence, language, and sex, but his world building is to be admired.

I like this quote, not just because it shows a wonderful relationship between parent and child, but because of its great truth. To pick up a snake when you’re not afraid of snakes is no act of bravery. To kill a copperhead threatening your children when you’re terrified of snakes, is being brave.

For me, it is a fearful thing to put my stories and artwork out in the public eye. I suppose it’s because I fear my work isn’t good enough. I’ve never been part of “the in group,” so I think I’m pretty sure my creative work—and by extension, myself—will be rejected or thought less than acceptable. Whether in science-fiction and fantasy fandom at cons, at writers’ conventions, bookstore signing, or at an art exhibit—I’m always one step away from running out the door. (Though I’ve been told I hide it well!)

So when you see me at public venues, know I face a fear by being there. I’m not sure if I’m brave, but I do know my heart is racing and my hands are shaking—just a bit—as I pry myself from in front of the computer or drawing board and mingle with readers, writers, and fans.

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After skimming this article, I discovered I hadn’t read all of the books mentioned, so I’ve added a few novels to my “To Read” list. Most of the books on the list I’ve read. I agree with the article’s authors – The Lord of the Rings, War of the Worlds, Dune, A Game of Thrones, The Hunger Games, Foundation, The Martian Chronicles, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, The Left Hand of Darkness, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, etc. have changed science fiction and fantasy, and added to the genre.

There are other authors who’ve changed my perception of Science Fiction and Fantasy, but the writings of JRR Tolkien, Jules Verne, HG Wells, Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, George RR Martin, Suzanne Collins, JK Rowling, Frank Herbert, Ursula K. LeGuin, Douglas Adams, and the other authors listed in this aricle stand out.

By the way, the artwork featured in the post is nice, too.

What do you think of 21 Books That Changed Science Fiction and Fantasy Forever? Were your favorites named?

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