Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Appearances’ Category

Ethereal Tales Special Issue All writers start somewhere. I thought it would be fun to take a look back at some of the magazines which published my writing. A few still exist (in one form or the other), some have fallen into the cracks of speculative publication history, others can still be located with some effort.

Illumen Spring 2015 But no matter the fame or lack thereof of the editors, I am grateful to them for publishing my writing. Their acceptance and subsequent publication of my poems or prose helped me to remember my words had worth, and sent me forward on my writing journey.

Illumen Spring 2010 Ethereal Tales Special Issue (includes my story, “Black Bear”) was published by Morpheus Tales as a farewell to a fine magazine which I had the honor of having had a story in (“The Garden Shop”). Illumen, now published by Alban Lake Publishing, was (along with Scifaikuest) originally published by the now-closed, Sam’s Dot Publishing (I had poems published here).

Scifaikuest Feb 2010 Elektrik Milk Bath Press published both a speculative poetry magazine, Paper Crow, (which included my poetry) and a series of speculative anthologies (which included my fiction). All of the publications were wonderful reads, and I’m hoping their editor, Angela Craig, is able to get healthy and start publishing again.

Paper Crow Fall Winter 2010 Editors of Indie press (it used to be call small press – and I much prefer the new label) publications are a special breed. With little chance of profit, and a great chance of putting lots of their own money into an Indie press to help to stay afloat, they persevere. It is through their efforts that many a writer (and illustrator, I might add) have their first stories, poems, essays, and artwork presented to readers.

Paper Crow Spring Summer 2013 A good example (in my case) were the publications edited by Jessica Amanda Salmonson (published by Richard H. Fawcett). Fantasy and Terror and Fantasy Macabre were early appearances on the other side of the USA of my speculative poetry.

Paper Crow Spring Summer 2011 But when I glance around those long ago Table of Contents, I see I’m not the only writer to have had their early work published by Jessica and Richard. Thank goodness for folks like them who encouraged this (and other) new speculative writers to keep on writing.

Fantasy & Terror 10 The last publisher I’ll mention in this post is the Science Fiction Poetry Association. Let’s face it, poetry isn’t at the top of most people’s reading list. Maybe it’s the bad poetry often force-fed to students when they’re young, but many readers grow up not only not caring about poetry – but actually disliking it.

Fantasy & Terror 9 I, or the other hand, have loved poetry since childhood. It is truly where I began my writing hobby which morphed into a writing career.

In my neck of the woods, nearly forty years ago when I went looking for other writers in the rural part of Maryland where I live, the Harford Poetry Society was it. They graciously helped me grow as a writer and tolerated my strange interest in speculative poetry – and eventually, sf/f/h fiction.

Starline Jan Feb 1987 So you can imagine my delight when I discovered Starline, the newsletter of the SFPA. I felt like shouting “Hooray!” upon discovering that science fiction and fantasy poetry was written and enjoyed by others.

Thanks again to the hard-working and under-paid editors of Indie presses. Though sunlight may have faded a few of the covers, I still treasure the magazines (and books) you produced simply for the love of speculative writing.

And to readers of speculative writing – do both yourself and new genre writers a favor – support Indie presses.

 

Read Full Post »

As an add-on to yesterday’s post, here’s the link to a bit of the Balticon interview with George RR Martin. A very humble, down-to-earth guy – even if he wanted to be a spaceman! Enjoy! George RR Martin at Balticon50.

Read Full Post »

Balticon 2016, also known as Balticon50, has come and gone. Per usual, it was a delightfully busy time for me.

I had an opportunity to chat with author friends, meet fans of my writing and art, read from my books, sign books, participate on panels, and present a writing workshop. In addition, I attended eSpec Book’s fabulous publication party, Gail Z. Martin’s publication party (she’s a wonderful reader – I so enjoyed listening to her fiction), an anthology meeting, and the SFWA meeting.

As a George RR Martin fan, I was happy to have a book signed by the brilliant author of Game of Thrones. (Yes, I’m quite taken with his use of language in the book series and eagerly await the next book).

Plus, I had the chance to meet and learn more about some of my fellow members of Broad Universe (women who write science fiction, fantasy, and horror).

All in all, it was a fabulous weekend. Many thanks to Baltimore Science Fiction Society for inviting me to participate. I hope you’ll want me back in 2017.

Now, I’m back to writing and revising. A new story, new book, and/or new painting is always on my to-do list.

Read Full Post »

IMG_2395 Only 2 weeks until Halloween and 6 days until HallowRead. So I decided to share with you one of my favorite readings of Edgar Allan Poe’s poem, The Raven. Actor Christopher Lee is the reader.

A bit of background: Christopher Lee began his film career in 1947 in the Gothic romance, Corridor of Mirrors. Lee co-stared in classic Hollywood horror films with Peter Cushing, Boris Karloff, and other well-known horror actors. He also played Sherlock Holmes in several movies. Star Wars fans will recognize him as the villainous Count Dooku.  Fans of The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit trilogies will remember him as the wizard, Saruman, Interestingly, he was the only member of the casts to have actually met JRR Tolkien. Other recent films he appeared in include: Sleepy Hollow, Corpse Bride, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, Alice in Wonderland, and Dark Shadows.

The Raven is a long poem, so be prepared to lean back, relax (if you dare), and listen to a marvelous Raven recitation by British actor, Christopher Lee.

Read Full Post »

IMG_1833 Halloween, the day when ghostly and ghastly thoughts swirl about like an autumn wind, is 17 days away.  A week ago, October 7th, was the 166th anniversary of Poe’s death in my hometown of Baltimore, Maryland. So naturally, I chose an Edgar Allen Poe quote for today.

“The boundaries which divide Life from Death are at best shadowy and vague. Who shall say where the one ends, and where the other begins.” – Edgar Allan Poe in The Premature Burial.

What a perfect quote for this pre-Day of the Dead time. In the era of The Walking Dead, Ghost Hunters, Twilight, and other undead delights. For fans of the undead, two of my zombie-ghost tales are currently available in new books. “The Return of Gunnar Kettilson” can be found in the beautifully-bound Gothic fantasy collection, Chilling Ghost Short Stories from United Kingdom’s Flame Tree Publishing. And from the USA’s Alban Lake Publishing, Potter’s Field 5 – Tales from Unmarked Graves, contains my story “Snowbroth.” (Also available on Kindle).

For Poe fans, here are some other EA Poe quotes: 30 Thoughtful Quotes from Edgar Allan Poe.

And don’t forget, I’ll be at HallowRead October 23 presenting a workshop on Anthologies at 1 PM, and on October 24 I’ll be participating on various spooky, dark panels.  Plus, I’ll be happy to sell and/or sign my books and talk to fans of dark fantasy and horror.

Read Full Post »

I had the pleasure of doing an interview with fellow speculative writers and friends, Paul Lagasse and Gary Lester on the last day of Baltimore Science Fiction Society’s Balticon 49 for the audio show: Channel 37 – Serial Science Fiction from the Distant Reaches of UHF.

Alas, the only place to record the conversation was in the foyer of the hotel lobby – so you will hear people walking by and automatic doors whooshing open and close. Nevertheless, I hope you’ll turn up the volume and enjoy:

Channel 37 Audio Invasion Episode 13 featuring Vonnie Winslow Crist.

Thanks, Paul and Gary. Though exhausted after a busy weekend at Balticon, I hope I make sense and give your listeners (and my readers) something to think about.

Read Full Post »

I’ll be appearing at HallowRead 2015 in Elllicott City, Maryland on October 23 and 24. Lots of ghostly fun and information for readers and writers alike including panels, workshops, ghost tours, book signings, author chats, a haunted house, and more.

The fine folks of HallowRead have put together a great video promoting the event. Here’s the video link to take a look.

Hope to see you there!

Read Full Post »

Every now and again, I let my readers know where they can find some of my stories. I’m always grateful to the editors who’ve selected my tales, and to the readers who keep coming back for more of the stories my somewhat skewed brain dishes out.

So for those looking for good reads (not just of my stories, but of the  many other wonderful tales included in these publications), here’s the list with links:

“Snowbroth,” a zombie/ghostly tale, Potter’s Field 5, edited by Robert Krog, from Alban Lake Publishing. (available)

“The Return of Gunnar Kettilson,” a zombie love story with a Norse vibe, Chilling Ghost Short Stories, from Flame Tree Publishing (UK). Flame Tree Publishing has even included a nice blog post with some of the included authors’ bios. (available for preorder)

“Scarecrow,” a dark science fiction love story, Trysts of Fate #4 – Aug. 2015, edited by lee Ann Story Sikora, from Alban Lake Publishing. (available)

“Beneath the Summer Moon,” a fantasy tale of transformation, Epona’s Children, edited by Carol Hightshoe, available soon from Wolfsinger Publications. (I’ll post link when available).

“Smoke and Sprites,” a science fiction tale set on Mars, Hides the Dark Tower, available soon from Pole to Pole Publishing. (I’ll post link when available).

I’ll add a bit of writer’s advice to the bottom of this post: Keep submitting!

I know this seems like a no-brainer, but it’s important to focus on reaching your readers. When (notice I don’t say, “If”) a story is rejected, find another market and send it out again. Keep sending your story out until you find a market, or until you’re ready to revise the story, and then, start submitting again. Persistence is the key to being published.

As I’ve told writers’ groups in many a presentation, “Sometimes, I think an editor is just tired of seeing submissions from me. They finally give up and say, ‘Let’s just take a story, so she’ll leave us alone!'” All kidding aside, a writer is never published unless they submit their stories to publications. Which means, a writer never finds their readers unless they submit their work to magazines, anthologies, etc. Best of luck to all of you writers out there as you look for publishers.

Read Full Post »

I’ve attended and participated in many writers conferences over the years. When I return home after spending a day or more surrounded by other people who love writing and books as much as I do, I usually feel rejuvenated and ready to tackle the stack of writing projects on my desk (and floor and bookcase top…)

Sometimes, I’ve managed to take helpful notes. If so, I try to type those up while my memory of the workshop or presentation is still fresh. The longer I wait to type those notes, the fuzzier my memory of the extra details I didn’t jot down will become.

Sometimes, I’ve made a few interesting contacts. And I’ll have a stack of business cards ready to add to my contact file. Lesson learned over the years – always jot a note to yourself on the back of each business card so you’ll remember why this person is important to you. Again, as soon as you get home, expand those notes so in a few months the networking contact will still have meaning.

Sometimes, attending a conference will lead to another presentation opportunity. Follow up on the contact as soon as you’re able to do so. You might remember, but the other person’s memory of the offered (or mentioned) opportunity will soon fade. Networking only works when you follow up!

When presenting, sometimes the presentation doesn’t go as you plan. As soon as you get home, review why it wasn’t as good as it could have been. Come up with ideas to improve the presentation for the next time you’re asked to speak on that subject.

A note here – my worst presentation wasn’t due to anything I did in particular! My presentation time slot was the last of the day, the room was stiffling, there was a loud fan directly beside me, a librarian kept moving around behind me, there were too many people crammed in the room… I tried to adjust for the circumstances, and veering from my planned presentation made me anxious and eager to “just get it over with.” If this conference asks me again to do a presentation, I’ll request an earlier time slot and a more spacious room. I’ll also “stick to the plan,” so I feel more relaxed.

An interesting take on making the most of a writing conference can be found in this Build Book Buzz article.

Hope to see you at a writing conference!

Read Full Post »

Like many authors and illustrators, I attend various author events in hopes of meeting my readers and selling a few books (and maybe a poster or 2 of my artwork).

It’s always a challenge to find a way to engage the attendees without scaring them away by being too aggressive. When someone stops by my table, I try to be friendly, and (gulp) suggest they look at one of my books.

I often wonder if there are better ways to attract people to stop and chat, and then buy my books, posters, illustration pendants, etc. I came across an interesting post from DerpyGurl which has some great tips for authors. Don’t be put off by the title if you’re not attending Comic Con or writing science-fiction and fantasy – this article is very informative for all authors.

Enjoy!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »