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Archive for April, 2017

White ravens are rare – perhaps because the color variance makes them more prone to disease and predators. But their white feathers also seem to add credence to the myth that credits Raven with fetching fire from the sun and bringing it back to earth after the gods had taken fire away. In helping earth’s inhabitants, Raven sacrificed his beautiful plumage and lovely voice.

While in Alaska and western Canada, I saw many ravens. The intelligence in the birds’ eyes and their clever behavior suggested far more awareness than humans like to give animals credit for. I even saw one raven prying open a sunroof in order to get to a bag of groceries. And though I didn’t see if he or she was successful, it seem quite likely that the bird managed to get inside the car and pillage the groceries (including a very obvious loaf of bread) before making an escape out the sunroof.

Alas, I have yet to see a white raven, yet I love the myth associated with the creature.

Myths, of all sorts, are one of my passions. I think they add to our understanding of the people of the past, ourselves, and our species. And, dear reader, the word myth does not mean an untruth – rather a system of belief which may or may not be one you believe.

For your reading and viewing pleasure, here’s a little article on white ravens.

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Grue Magazine 7 Yesterday, I wrote about some of my early Science Fiction and Fantasy publications in the SF Spectrum Publications in the United Kingdom.

Today, I want to mention a few of the SF and F magazines which included my speculative work very early in my writing career. Again, I want to thank these editors who not only devoted time and talents to sharing their love of science fiction, fantasy, and horror — but who often put in their own money.

Worlds of Wonder Oct 87 I am not the only writer who benefited from their efforts. Everyone begins somewhere, and many writers and illustrators whose names are now recognizable began on the pages of these (or similar) Indie publications.

Thank you to Gary William Crawford of Supernatural Poetry who published my poem, “Driftwood,” and Robert E. Cooke of Worlds of Wonder who published my poems “Chains,” “Deep Water,” and “Caverns.”

Supernatural Poetry One Also thanks to John Postovit of Alpha Adventures: Science Fiction and Fantasy Magazine for publishing my poem, “A Circle of Pillars,” Janet Fox of Scavenger’s Newsletter for publishing my poem, “A Robot’s Question,” and Peggy Nadramia of Grue Magazine for publishing my poem, “Not Seen.”

And lastly, thank you to Donald L. Miller of The Nightmare Express for publishing my poem, “Omens” and Charles M. Saplak of Celestial Shadows for publishing my prose piece, “Fish Story.”

Alpha Adventures Sept 85 By publishing my work and the work of other speculative writers in these labor-intensive Indie magazines, these editors introduced a new crop of storytellers to readers. Their hard work is why many successful writers of today have a reader base.

For example, I share the Table of Contents in the issue of Grue Magazine mentioned above with Wayne Allen Sallee, Keith Allen Daniels, Elizabeth Massie, Mort Castle, John Maclay, Kevin J. Anderson, J.N. Williamson, Jessica Amanda Salmonson, Mark Rich, and other wonderful writers. I feel lucky!

So while I’d love to have you purchase books from the “big” publishers, don’t forget to support the Indie publishers. – Vonnie

Scavengers Jan 87

Celestial Shadows 92Nightmare Express May 87

 

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SF Spectrum 9 Among my early Science Fiction and Fantasy publications, were poetry, art, and fiction in SF Spectrum and Macabre, both from SF Spectrum Publications, Nottingham, United Kingdom.

Editor, Wieslaw Tumulka, included my work in 8 issues of his magazines. For a woman from the USA, it was quite exciting to know her words and images were reaching a few readers across the Atlantic.

SF Spectrum 10 I felt privileged to share the pages with artist Steve Lines and writers J. N. Williamson, T. Winter-Damon, Steve Sneyd, John B. Rosenman, Don Webb, Andrew Darlington, John Haines, George Gott, and Mark Valentine,  and many more talented individuals.

In 1986 and 1987 when my work appeared in SF Spectrum and Macabre, the standard format for small or Indie presses was pieces of letter (or legal) sized paper printed on both sides, then, the stack of pages was folded in half and stapled.

SF Spectrum 12 Not very glamorous compared to many of today’s Indie publications, but this was before the advent of computers.

Tumulka, and other Indie publishers/editors were devoted to publishing and sharing the work of writers and artists whose work they believed their readers would enjoy. And in those days, there weren’t online versions and wide distribution — so a contributor “sold” First British Rights, First North American Rights, First Australian Rights, etc. rather than First World Rights or First English Language Rights.

Macabre 7 So which pieces of my writing and artwork did Wieslaw Tumulka choose to include in issues of his speculative magazines? Here is the complete (I think) list:

Poems: “More than Curiosity,” “Saturn’s Song,” “Snapdragons,” “A Circle of Pillars,” “Aware, After All These Years,” “Surgical Leftovers,” “Right Now,” and “Flies.”

Illustrations: “Skeleton in the Toy Box” and “Blooming Skulls” (a cover illustration shown here).

Prose: “Frycakes and Caruso.”

And so I conclude this visit to my past writing/art appearances with a thank you to Wieslaw Tumulka for selecting and publishing my work. It helped give me confidence to keep on creating. And a thanks to the writers and artists whose work I enjoyed in those long ago issues of SF Spectrum and Macabre.

Keep on reading! – Vonnie

Macabre 8

SF Spectrum 11

Macabre 6

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