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Archive for September, 2015

“Map out your future – but do it in pencil. The road ahead is as long as you make it. Make it worth the trip.” – Jon Bon Jovi

Yes, I am a Bon Jovi fan! And I love this quote. Maybe it’s because I use a pencil to sketch out my art before I use more permanent media like ink or paint. But I think I also love it, because I know that the future is very fluid, and even if we guess one thing right – in all likelihood, we’ll get a lot of other things wrong.

A fun article about predicting part of the future right by using Victorian postcards (but not all of it), appeared on Wired. Thanks to Ted Weber on the Baltimore Science Fiction Society’s Facebook page for pointing me towards: Here’s How People 100 Years Ago Thought We’d Be Living Today by Greg Miller.

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Confession time: I’m a space geek. If I was younger and the opportunity was offered, I expect I’d volunteer to go to Mars.

Which is why I’m looking forward to seeing the new movie, “The Martian” featuring Matt Damon,  based on the self-published book by Andy Weir. (In 2014, the book finally did find a traditional publisher). Not only does the movie look good, but the fact that Andy Weir believed in his writing enough to self-publish it, and then, was “discovered” is pretty cool. (And every self-published author’s dream).

But what I’m really excited about is there’s water on Mars. Hooray! One thing necessary for life (as we know it) checked off the list.

Want to read more about water on Mars? Here’s a link to: NASA Says Signs of Liquid Water Flowing on Mars from The New York Times. Enjoy!

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Daniel Beazley

Thanks to author, Daniel Beazley, for stopping by and sharing how he looked through his older stories, re-wrote, polished, and resurrected a tale suitable for a tower-themed anthology. Enjoy!

Resurrecting an Old Story by Daniel Beazley

When I saw the call out for submissions to Pole to Pole Publishing’s, Hides the Dark Tower anthology, I remembered a short piece that I’d written way back in 2004. My writing was still very raw then, but it’s always interesting to trawl back through your work if you’re willing to brave the horrendous wreckage that normally lies in wait. However, it was only the idea I was after, and once I started reading, I knew it would be perfect for this anthology if I could only polish it into something that resembled readable material.

The anthology’s theme led me to thinking about towers in general, and I considered what it would be like if there was a great tower, but only the tip of it could be seen protruding from the ground. What horrors would lurk beneath, and what would be the reason for such a creation to exist?

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Dark Ascent’ is based in a fictional land that I visualised as being similar to North America in its pre-colonial days. I have always had a keen fascination with Native American tribes, and it was from this that I took my protagonist. It follows a young brave who is on a spiritual journey and comes across a sinister scene that prompts a further investigation. This in turn leads him to a village where he discovers something ancient and horrifying, something that could threaten the very existence of his people.

I am certain you’ll really enjoy this anthology, and I can honestly say it is one of the best I have read in a long time. Vonnie and Kelly have done a great job in selecting an incredible collection of stories that will have you perched on the edge of your seats wanting more, especially ‘Squire Magic’ by Larry C. Kay, which was one of my favorites.

Sepherene

I would also like to take this opportunity to tell you a little bit about my recent book, Sepherene: The Complete Chronicles, which is a dark fantasy and sci-fi tale about a fallen angel, sprinkled with a subtle touch of mythology. If you like the sound of angels battling other angels in an attempt to save their souls, set within futuristic worlds in a time where religion is nothing more than a convenient commodity, then you’ll love this. As you can see, the cover art is excellent and it personifies the angel Sepherene brilliantly. Sepherene is available now as a paperback and eBook on Amazon.

Also if you enjoy humorous fantasy then you might like Goblins Know Best, a satirical tale about a goblin and orc partnership that follows them on some outrageous adventures. This book is available on Amazon as a paperback and eBook.

I’d like to thank Vonnie for giving me the opportunity to share with you a bit about ‘Dark Ascent’ and some of my other work. You can keep up to date with my writing and future projects through my website, facebook and twitter.”

Goblins Know Best

About the author: Daniel Beazley was born and raised in the South West of England. Growing up he became captivated and drawn into the World of fantasy courtesy of the writings of Tolkien, Feist, Gemmell, Lewis, Livingstone and Dever. These together with films like Conan, Red Sonja, The Dark Crystal, Willow and Krull, truly inspired him to want to join the creative journey that is fantasy. He began writing in 1996 whilst spending some time in the sunny climes of Sicily. This continued periodically whilst working in the Army and then the Police; living in various parts of the country as well as overseas. Daniel now lives with his family in the rural countryside of Devon.

Thanks again to Daniel Beazley for his guest post. Watch Whimsical Words for more guests, Quotable Wednesdays, blogs from me, and more. Have a darkly magical day! – Vonnie

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Hands-on learning is far more important than hearing someone else’s experiences.

Just like it’s easier to learn to knit with yarn and knitting needles in-hand than reading about the process or even watching a video; it’s easier to find your most productive writing process through trial and error.

Steven R. Southard has the second in his How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci series up on his blog, Poseidon’s Scribe. It’s an interesting take on da Vinci’s thinking and how to apply it to writing.

I recommend taking a look at this post which encourages writers to not trust Wikipedia and other peoples’ experiences, but to try things out for themselves. Or as Southard puts it: “test knowledge through experience, persistence, and a willingness to learn from mistakes.” Here’s the link to the article for your reading pleasure.

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I won’t support myself or become rich from writing. Most writers I know won’t make a living from writing or become rich. But sometimes I think the public believes writers make lots of money. Wrong!

Stephen King (It, Carrie, Cujo, Thinner, etc.) makes lots of money (but remember, some of that is from television and movies, not just books). JK Rowling, of Harry Potter fame, makes lots of money (some of that is from movies and merchandise). And a few other writers are doing very well financially with their books and television, films, and merchandise based on their books. They are the exceptions.

For every George R.R. Martin, of A Game of Thrones fame, there are thousands of writers who won’t make $100 per year from their writing. Especially if an author is self-published or published by a small independent press, he or she will likely make little more than the price of Happy Meal or two. Which is why most authors write because they love the written word, they love books, and/or they’re looking for a vehicle to tell the stories rattling around in their heads.

Here’s the link to an interesting blog post from Steve Laube (of The Steve Laube Agency) which explores: Most Writers Don’t Make A Lot of Money.

And if you’re motivated to support this author, here’s the link to my Amazon page. 🙂

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Like most writes, I’m always on the look out for helpful websites. I came across an interesting post on Global English Editing’s Blog which offers over 100 links to sites of interest to writers.

While I haven’t visited every site on their list, I have visited a number of the websites featured. Many of my readers who are writers or hope to be writers will probably find this article and its links useful.

So for your reading pleasure and as a help to writers, here’s The 120 Most Helpful Websites for Writers in 2015.

Enjoy!

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‘”There,” Jon said. He swung his horse around and galloped back across the bridge. They watched him dismount where the direwolf lay dead in the snow, watching him kneel. A moment later he was riding back to them, smiling.

“He must have crawled away from the others,” Jon said.

“Or been driven away,” their father said, looking at the sixth pup. His fur was white, where the rest of the litter was grey. His eyes were as red as the blood of the ragged man who had died that morning. Bran thought it curious that this pup alone would have opened his eyes while the others were still blind.’ — George R.R. Martin, A Game of Thrones

I’m a fan of George R.R. Martin’s writing. In this seemingly small exchange from the beginning of the first book in the Song of Ice and Fire series, the reader learns a lot about the children of Ned Stark. Since the direwolves are each given to one of Ned’s children, the quote seems to say that Jon is a Stark, too, and that he’s the only one who will see when his “brothers” and “sisters” are still blind. Hmm!

But that’s not why I picked a George R.R. Martin quote. I was pointed to an interesting article about the opening of a novel by fellow Broad Universe member, Greta van der Rol. In Myth #3 – ‘You have to know your “story problem” and “protagonist’s problem” before you start,’ the old terms “planners” and “pantsers” are used. I’ve never been a fan of those terms, and found the terms used by George R.R. Martin in that paragraph, “architects and gardeners,” more appealing and more accurate.

I count myself among the “gardeners,” because I, like Martin, plant a seed with just an idea of what the seed might become.

So for all you architects (outliners and planners), gardeners (those who write by the seat of their pants), and readers who enjoy understanding the inner workings of writing – check out Lit Reactor’s What Every Successful Novel Opening Must Do: Myth vs. Reality by Susan Defreitas. Let me know what you think!

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