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Archive for February, 2015

News today of Leonard Nimoy’s death brings sadness to many fans of Star Trek. As a kid, I watched the original show on television. Later, I enjoyed the re-runs and Star Trek movies featuring Spock, Kirk, Scotty, Bones, and the rest of the crew of the Starship Enterprise. And it was a delight to see an older Leonard Nimoy reprising his role in the new Star Trek movies.

Saturday is not my usual day for quotes, but an exception will be made. The man who played the ever logical Vulcan, Spock, Leonard Nimoy said: “Logic is the beginning of wisdom, not the end.” Which, if one thinks about it, is quite true.

On the subject of exploration, one would assume Nimoy would promote space exploration, instead he said: “That is the exploration that awaits you! Not mapping stars and studying nebula, but charting the unknown possibilities of existence.”

And lastly, I’ll quote a tweet from Leonard Nimoy sent on February 23, 2015 from @TheRealNimoy – “A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP”

For those Star Trek fans, like me, we know what LLAP stands for, and can raise a hand and separate our fingers in a Vulcanish manner. For those who don’t know (or remember), Leonard Nimoy’s final wish for his followers was “Live Long And Prosper.” And I, for one, will remember him.

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Wood’s Edge, along with much of the central and northern east coast, is snow-covered. Though snow and ice make traveling challenging, there is a take-your-breath-away beauty to the trees and fields glistening with new-fallen snow. With that wild, white beauty in mind, I chose a quote from Emily Bronte for this frigid day:

“I will smile when wreaths of snow Blossom where the rose should grow.” – Emily Bronte

And yes, I’ll smile this summer when my rosebushes are green-leafed and covered with blossoms, when the lazy bees hum their tunes, and the rich fragrance of roses fills the air. But today, I smile at wreaths of snow adorning the bare briars.

13 Owl Flying extra For those who’d like to read a few winter tales, my newest release, Owl Light, includes several chilly and magical tales.

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I am a fan of Deborah Harkness’s All Soul’s Trilogy which begins with A Discovery of Witches. I really appreciate her focus on historical detail as well as her unique take on witches, vampires, and daemons.

As a reader and writer, I like learning about an author’s take on their book, characters, writing habits, etc. – which is why I’m delighted to share a link to a Goodreads question session with Deborah Harkness. The author spent lots of time answering extra questions from her readers, so there’s lots of information.

I hope you enjoy Deborah Harkness on Goodreads as much as I do.

And if you visit the site, please take the time to visit my page and become a friend and fan. Also, if you’ve read one of my books, please post a rating and/or review. Thanks. 🙂

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green angel I had the great pleasure of hearing Alice Hoffman read her work and speak about her writing at a Maryland library last year. I went to the reading/talk with a friend who is crazy about Alice Hoffman’s work. (Even crazier about it than me!)

I think there’s nothing quite like hearing the words of a writer in her (or his) voice. To listen to the emphasis the creator places on a word or phrase, and notice the slight changes in facial expressions or tone of voice when the writer comes to a favorite part of the story is like peeking behind the curtain in Oz. It lets you see a bit of the person behind the words.

I have quite a few Alice Hoffman books on my shelves: Practical Magic, Green Heart, River King… plus, my autographed copy of The Museum of Extraordinary Things. I find wisdom in many of her books, and great truth in this Wednesday’s quote from her:

“It is the deepest desire of every writer, the one we never admit or even dare to speak of: to write a book we can leave as a legacy. And although it is sometimes easy to forget, wanting to be a writer is not about reviews or advances or how many copies are printed or sold. It is much simpler than that, and much more passionate. If you do it right, and if they publish it, you may actually leave something behind that can last forever.” – Alice Hoffman

Here’s to writing something worthy of good reviews, an advance, lots of copies printed and sold – and most importantly – a book worthy of leaving behind when my time has run out.

Like my posts? Why not stop by my Amazon page and buy one of my books? Thanks, and have a magical week. – Vonnie

 

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cinderI am a fan of Marissa Meyer’s young-adult science-fiction Lunar Chronicles Series: Cinder, Scarlet, and Cress. Plus, I must admit to be eagerly awaiting my copy of her newest book, Fairest.

As a reader and writer, I like learning about an author’s take on their book, characters, writing habits, etc. – which is why I’m delighted to share a link to a Goodreads question session with Marissa Meyer.

I hope you enjoy Marissa Meyer on Goodreads as much as I do.

And if you visit the site, please take the time to visit my page and become a friend and fan. Also, if you’ve read one of my books, please post a rating and/or review. Thanks. 🙂

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Evergreens We had a couple of inches of snow last night. Though the blustery wind has pushed the snow into small drifts, it isn’t deep enough to scoop up an unblemished bowlful.

You might be asking, why in the world would I be looking for a bowl of snow? Here’s the answer: When I was a kid, we used to gather snow from a location where the white fluddy stuff was as pure as possible. Then, we’d stir in some maple syrup and make a form of snow ice cream.

The idea for maple snow ice cream was from my Granny and Pop Crosby who’d grown up in Western New York with its lake-effect snowfall. Both had come from families of limited means. Maple syrup was available in the area for a reasonable price, if you didn’t gather maple sap and boil up your own syrup. And so our family’s maple snow ice cream tradition began many years ago in Western New York.

We also had a vanilla version of snow ice cream, which involved mixing sugar and vanilla and a bowlful of snow. For non-maple syrup lovers, it is an agreable substitute.

Variations of combining maple syrup and snow can be found in family cookbooks, online, and even in one of the Little House on the Prairie books by Laura Ingalls Wilder. With more snow in the forecast for next week for Wood’s Edge, I should be able to gather some snow and relive one of my favorite childhood memories.

Plus, as a writer who frequently writes about winter and frontier or rural locations, this little tidbit of Americana might just be included in a story. Writers need to remember to include specific details in their stories, and what is more specific than a homemade treat using snow?

For those who’d like to try a snow-maple delicacy, here’s a link to an easy maple sugar snow candy. So gather your bowls, spoons, and syrup bottle – and let it snow!

If you’re enjoying my blog, why not buy one of my books and post a review?

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small owl light When I see a new review for my book has been published on a website, I always hold my breath for a moment as I click on the link. It shouldn’t matter what a reviewer thinks about my writing – but it does!

Many thanks to reviewer January Gray for her kind words. A sample quote: “A very pleasurable and magical book you will read over and over.” Thanks to January, also, for her 5 Star rating on Amazon. To read all of January’s comments about Owl Light, visit her webpage.

Owl Light has 5 reviews, all 5 Stars. Woot! I hope some of you might be interested in buying and reading this collection of science fiction, fantasy, steampunk, and ghost-tale stories. (And please post a review so I can read what YOU thought about Owl Light).

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