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Archive for June, 2014

KellyAHarmon03172010e Thanks to author Kelly A. Harmon for stopping by and sharing some thoughts about her new novel, Stoned in Charm City – Charm City Darkness Book I. But before we read Kelly’s comments, here’s the back cover blurb of Stoned in Charm City:

“Forty dollars. Two crisp twenties. All that stands between Assumpta Mary-Margaret O’Connor and homelessness.

For the price of forty dollars, she helps archeologist Greg LaSpina find something he’s lost—and causes all Hell to break loose.

Literally.

With demons tormenting their every step, Assumpta and Greg become both hunted and hunter in their search for a way to send the demons back to Hell. One careless mistake could cost them their lives.

Wrestling with her faith, Assumpta considers as offer made by one very sexy demon: sleep with him, and learn how to rid the world of escaped evil.

But the offer comes with a steep price: her immortal soul.”

Stoned in Charm Cityby Kelly A. Harmon

“I grew up in Baltimore, and it was very natural to use Baltimore as the backdrop for Stoned in Charm City.

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000039_00001] Baltimore was dubbed Charm City in the mid-1970s. It came about when the mayor at the time, William Donald Schaefer, hired four of the leading ad-men in Baltimore, to come up with a campaign to do something about Baltimore’s bad image. (At the time, Baltimore had very little to recommend it: there was no Harbor Place, no Oriole Park, and no Ravens!)

It took only five full-page ads in local newspapers, each with a charm bracelet depicted at the bottom, to cement the name “Charm City.”

Here are some other fun facts about Baltimore:

*Baltimore is home to the Enoch Pratt Free Library, one of the oldest free public library systems in the United States. The main character of the book, Assumpta, spends a lot of time there. I don’t want to spoil it, but let’s just say she meets some very interesting people there.

*Edgar Allen Poe led a prominent life in Baltimore. He’s buried in Baltimore’s Westminster Cemetery on Fayette Street. Well after he died, his personal library of books was given over to the Enoch Pratt Library. It’s in the Poe Room at Enoch Pratt that Assumpta does much of her research.

*The first successful balloon launch in the US occurred in Baltimore in 1784. The operator of the balloon? Thirteen-year-old Edward Warren.

*The Basilica of the Assumption, the US’s first catholic cathedral is located in Baltimore. (It’s not important to the story, but I mention it because Assumpta is named after the Catholic precept of the assumption.)

*Snowballs! Or snow cones, shaved ice, or slushies—whatever you call them—were invented in Baltimore during the American Industrial Revolution. (No spoilers here, so I can’t tell you why Assumpta would be dying for one of these when she comes back from a trip…)

To learn more, you’ll have to read the book!”

Want to discover more about Kelly A. Harmon and Stoned in Charm City? Visit her website, Facebook page, Facebook Fan page, or twitter.

And you can purchase Stoned in Charm City at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, and iTunes.

Thanks again to Kelly A. Harmon for her guest post. Watch Whimsical Words for more guests, Quotable Wednesdays, Saturday Owl posts, blogs from me, and ocasional Readers & Writers Recipes. Have a charmed day! – Vonnie

 

 

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This is the sixth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

0 Owl & Moon cover page Owl art: One of my owl scratchboard drawings from Owl Light.

Owl fact: While most owls are nocturnal, a few species feed during the day or at dusk.

Owl folklore: Sir Walter Scott must have believed, like many people of his time, owls were harbingers of doom, death, and bad news when he wrote: “Birds of omen dark and foul,/ Night-crow, raven, bat, and owl,/ Leave the sick man to his dream –/ All night long he heard your scream.”

Owl link: Want to know more about Northern Owls? Check out Owlman’s Owl in a Night’s Work page.  and a video of a Boreal Owl.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

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hunger games Here’s a link to an article which actually encourages adult readers to pick up a Young Adult book: Why Young Adult Books are Not Only Acceptable, but Beneficial for Adults

This YA debate has stirred up quite a bit of talk online and off. Again, I’ll admit to not only reading YA books, but enjoying them. (And it’s not just because I write YA).

How about you – are you a YA reader? Next week, more of the YA debate.

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graceling Another voice sounds off in the YA debate: In Praise of Reading Whatever in the Hell You Want

If you missed earlier posts on the subject, here are links to Against YA and More YA Discussion and Adults Read YA Books. I’m actually shocked by the number of adults who don’t read YA – they’re missing out on lots of good books!

What do you think? Check back tomorrow for another point of view on the YA firestorm.

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green angel For those who haven’t read Against YA, read it first, then read this response from another writer: Really? Are We Still Shaming People for the Books They Like?

Where do you stand? Do you read YA books even if you’re no longer a Young Adult? And teens and twenty-somethings, do you resent older adults reading books designated YA?

By the way, I’ve decided to add the scan of the cover of a YA book from my bookshelf to each post. Today’s YA fav of mine: Green Angel by Alice Hoffman (and I love the companion book, Green Witch, too).

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This is the fifth blog in a series of owl-focused posts to promote Owl Light, my new YA-friendly collection of stories featuring owls. Each post features a mix of owl art, facts, folklore, quotes, and links to owlish sites. If you’re a fan of owls, or know someone whooo is, follow my blog, buy my book, and be kind to these beautiful birds.

2 Pawprints large art Owl art: One of my owl pen and ink sketches from Owl Light.

Owl fact: There are over 150 species of owls (and some folks think that number to be over 200 species).

Owl folklore: In some cultures, an owl hanging around a home is a sign that a powerful shaman lives in the house and is using the bird as a messenger.

Owl link: If you’re looking for fabulous owl pictures and lots of owl info, you might want to check out The Owls Plexus  and an audio and video of a Barred Owl.

And, of course, here’s a buy link for Owl Light.
Or buy it from The Owl Pages and help out owls.

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lament There’s a firestorm brewing over whether adults should be reading Young Adult books. And if they are, whether they should be embarrassed by admitting their YA book choices.

Here’s the link to: Against YA – Adults Should be Embarrassed to Read Children’s Books, the first discussion of this dilemma.

Do you agree with the author? Check back on June 24th for another point of view tomorrow.

By the way, I’ve decided to add the scan of the cover of a YA book from my bookshelf to each post. Today’s YA fav of mine: Lament by Maggie Stiefvater.

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